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Pfeffle of Pfeff Hall Studies the Map of Europe

by john_evans Thu Jul 25th, 2019 at 12:05:46 PM EST

and we may laugh. It's about all we can do. Pfeffle's progression to Number 10, and the appointment of a very rightwing and Brexiteer Cabinet went without a hitch.

What happens now?

Frontpaging an old frontpager is such fun! - Frank Schnittger


After three wasted years, the real negotiations with the European Union will begin. Hard-headed, serious negotiators, with a strong conscience that they represent the voice of the British people, will lock horns with Brussels bureaucrats. Multiple all-nighters later, the lines of an acceptable deal will be noted down, soon to be engraved in marble.

Of course not. Pfeffle and his chums aren't into that sort of tiresome game. As has already been said and said again, there's no time left for it anyway. When Pfeffle says "Do or die" or "No ifs, no buts", he is in fact saying there will be no serious attempt at discussing an alternative agreement with the EU. It will be:

Pfeffle to EU: The British people want this, and this, and this, with double fries.

EU to Pfeffle: We've already said no. You can get the fries at <well-known junk-food outlet>.

Billionaire UK media to British public: It's all the EU's fault!

And that will not take long.

Then we will see that Pfeffle is not in government to govern, not in politics to pursue policies (let alone to waste time devising them), not in the representation of his country to conduct responsible discussions with other countries. He'll stick to the interests of his class by gut instinct, make arbitrary decisions with a show of authority, and flail around imaginary conquests at the end of his stumpy arms. Like Trump? For sure, and like Trump, he is in permanent campaign mode.

We know how Pfeffle campaigns. We saw it in 2016, and the nomination as Special Adviser of Dominic Cummings, leader of the mendacious Leave campaign, is a rinse and repeat sign. How does Pfeffle campaign? By piffle, waffle, racist and xenophobic insinuation, bullshit, propaganda, lies, distortion, more lies. By manipulation of uninformed or wilfully ill-informed opinion.

As soon as that opinion considers it a fact that the EU is kicking the UK out, or that no deal is inevitable despite the best efforts etc, or that Pfeffle is personally conducting a last desperate battle with the evil monsters of Europe on the final brink, or some such crap, the wind will be taken out of the Brexit Party's sails, and the coast will be clear for the Tories to beat a divided opposition in a general election and re-establish a comfortable Commons majority. On the strength of which he will crash the UK out of the EU and refuse to pay the £39bn.

Will all of this happen? A good deal of it is certain. The electoral victory, maybe not, but Britain is surely in for a display of demagogic politics that will be a sight to behold.

Just one thing. Step back a bit. When democracy is raped in this fashion, when public opinion is misled into believing that foreigners are the root of all problems, that such and such a foreign entity has stabbed the country in the back, that treaty obligations are made to be torn up, then the conditions for the maintenance of peace and friendly relations are not met. When economic conditions are bad and social tensions are high, the easy way out for big capital is war. And anyway, how else did Britain sail off to far-away places and get rich?

Ha! Ha! Said the clown.

Display:
Free ports are money laundering threat, says Commission
Incoming UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson is a big fan.

Those fuddy-duddies in Brussels just don't get it, do they?


Things are going to slide, slide in all directions
Won't be nothing
Nothing you can measure anymore
L. Cohen

by john_evans (john(dot)evans(dot)et(at)gmail(dot)com) on Thu Jul 25th, 2019 at 12:17:09 PM EST
Fintan O'Toole:

As Boris Johnson walked up to the podium at 10 Downing Street to make his first address as prime minister, they should have played Leonard Cohen's Everybody Knows as his fanfare: "Everybody knows that the boat is leaking / Everybody knows that the captain lied." For the one thing that can be said in Johnson's defence is that he is not a conman. Yes, of course, he speaks fluent falsehood as his native language. But he deceives no one. Everybody knows.



Things are going to slide, slide in all directions
Won't be nothing
Nothing you can measure anymore
L. Cohen
by john_evans (john(dot)evans(dot)et(at)gmail(dot)com) on Thu Jul 25th, 2019 at 01:45:01 PM EST
Her handbag with the SNP logo.

by gk (gk (gk quattro due due sette @gmail.com)) on Thu Jul 25th, 2019 at 03:09:58 PM EST
Notice the British Dyson cool air purifier near the mantelpiece.
[(c) Dyson Singapore]

Global Warming - distance between America and Europe is steadily increasing.
by Oui on Thu Jul 25th, 2019 at 04:28:48 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Martin Kettle in the Guardian:
 ...this is a political transition unlike any other. It is a massive rupture, not a seamless progression. Its outcome is dark-clouded in uncertainty. Any idea that the events of 24 July 2019 embody the same timeless magic of the peaceful passing of parliamentary power that constitutional experts like to celebrate is for the birds. For this is an unprecedented partisan seizure of power by the radical part of the Conservative party that seeks Brexit whatever the cost. It is a hard Brexit coup dressed up as politics as usual.


Things are going to slide, slide in all directions
Won't be nothing
Nothing you can measure anymore
L. Cohen
by john_evans (john(dot)evans(dot)et(at)gmail(dot)com) on Thu Jul 25th, 2019 at 07:08:10 PM EST
Read this if you read nothing else:

Why are the technocrats who held sway almost everywhere a few years ago giving way to extravagant buffoons?

Social media, an incubator of absurdity, is certainly part of the story. But while there has been plenty of good work investigating the means, there has been surprisingly little thinking about the ends. Why are the ultra-rich, who until recently used their money and newspapers to promote charisma-free politicians, now funding this circus? Why would capital wish to be represented by middle managers one moment and jesters the next?

The reason, I believe, is that the nature of capitalism has changed.

(...)

The killer clowns offer the oligarchs something else too: distraction and deflection. While the kleptocrats fleece us, we are urged to look elsewhere. We are mesmerised by buffoons who encourage us to channel the anger that should be reserved for billionaires towards immigrants, women, Jews, Muslims, people of colour and other imaginary enemies and customary scapegoats. Just as it was in the 1930s, the new demagoguery is a con, a revolt against the impacts of capital, financed by capitalists.



Things are going to slide, slide in all directions
Won't be nothing
Nothing you can measure anymore
L. Cohen
by john_evans (john(dot)evans(dot)et(at)gmail(dot)com) on Fri Jul 26th, 2019 at 05:33:30 AM EST
Excellent article ... I am working on a diary to explain how the Silicon Valley tech community has become an essential part of the Pentagon, U.S. Government and the War Machine. Influence beyond the funding of politicians by the Wall Street oligarchs.

The oligarchs feel mostly at ease with Conservatives like Tories and the GOP, but not exclusively. See the distraction of "Russian" influence so we forget about Facebook, Cambridge Analytica, AIQ, SCL and Robert Mercer / Paul Singer / Sheldon Adelson / Koch Bros.

Another distraction offered by these oligarchs are the eurosceptici and the climate change deniers. Sometimes they are succesful by the young voters of the Conservative party ... the growth of the Green movement is urgently needed as a political force.

Global Warming - distance between America and Europe is steadily increasing.

by Oui on Fri Jul 26th, 2019 at 07:00:56 AM EST
[ Parent ]
That's why the rightwing extremists of the Brexiteers and their backers have an ultimate goal for the UK .... a no-deal exit to regain the Island perspective of legal isolation from the EU and its policing institutions.

In addition the UK foreign policy will be fully in hands of Downing Street 10 and GCHQ / MI6 can work without hinder and oversight.

Global Warming - distance between America and Europe is steadily increasing.

by Oui on Fri Jul 26th, 2019 at 07:13:23 AM EST
[ Parent ]
their problem is that a no deal will push the country into a crisis very quickly. There are a lot of signs that, even now, the brexiteers still haven't really grasped what is going to happen.

If they expect the EU to renew negotiations as if they were starting afresh, then they are going to be surprised. I imagine that the cost of entry into negotiations will be £39 billion, cash down. The EU would be daft if they didn't

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Fri Jul 26th, 2019 at 05:35:39 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Eurointelligence is not optimistic:

What should the EU do now?

But, when confronted with a partner willing to accept a no-deal Brexit, the situation changes. The EU will need to consider, for the first time in earnest, the political dynamics in the European Council in the days and hours before a no-deal Brexit. Are they really prepared for it as they say? Politically and technically?

We don't think so. The German media has spent the last two years in denial that Brexit is happening, focusing much of its reporting on the second-referendum campaign. Lately they switched to portraying Johnson as a buffoon or, in the case of Spiegel, as a madman. But what will happen once they realise that Germany is about to face tariffs in the two largest export markets for its cars, the US and the UK? We think that complacency will turn to panic overnight, as it so often does in European politics. The EU will need a strategy to deal with the Johnson administration. EU leaders will need to explore among themselves how far they will go in opening up the discussion on the Irish backstop. And they will need a no-deal strategy that goes beyond the regulatory preparations of the European Commission.

by Bernard on Fri Jul 26th, 2019 at 07:14:22 PM EST
[ Parent ]
EuroIntelligence seems to have been reading the conservative wish list.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Fri Jul 26th, 2019 at 07:45:55 PM EST
[ Parent ]
by Frank Schnittger (mail Frankschnittger at hot male dotty communists) on Fri Jul 26th, 2019 at 08:24:05 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The UK-US relations are "phenominal" 😄

Whose bluster will win: Johnson or Trump?

MAGA - strictly self interest.

Today Trump doesn't like Emmanuel Macron ... threatens tarifs on French wine imports. Just sayin ...

Global Warming - distance between America and Europe is steadily increasing.

by Oui on Fri Jul 26th, 2019 at 08:39:09 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The German media has spent the last two years in denial that Brexit is happening

The banks of Denial stretch far from their home in Egypt.


She believed in nothing; only her skepticism kept her from being an atheist. -- Jean-Paul Sartre

by ATinNM on Sat Jul 27th, 2019 at 06:34:29 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I almost troll-rated that.

Things are going to slide, slide in all directions
Won't be nothing
Nothing you can measure anymore
L. Cohen
by john_evans (john(dot)evans(dot)et(at)gmail(dot)com) on Sun Jul 28th, 2019 at 07:18:34 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Europe's Greens are on fire... and it's not just because of the sweltering heat | The Guardian - Opinion |

A s Europe suffers another summer of record-breaking heatwaves, it is worth reflecting on the group perhaps least happy to benefit from the soaring temperatures - Green parties across the continent, which are, however, in a better electoral position than ever.

[...]

In 2016, only 6% of EU citizens listed the environment as one of the two most important issues affecting their country. Just two years later, this figure had risen to 14% and is still climbing. In the latest Eurobarometer - a survey which monitors public opinion in every member state - 22% of Germans, 41% of Dutch and 39% of Swedes ranked "the environment, climate and energy" as one of their country's top two most important issues. By contrast, southern and eastern Europeans remain fairly uninterested - just 1% of Greeks picked the issue in 2018, the same as in 2005. The UK ranks somewhere in the middle, at 11%, though this summer has seen a sharp increase.

Why is the salience of the environment soaring? Historically, some academics have played down the effects of "real-world" events or citizens' abilities to deduce which issues matter, instead emphasising strategic manipulation of the agenda by the media and politicians. While these certainly count, the salience of the environment, like that of most other issues, ultimately does reflect real events.

If western European social democratic parties want to regain offices of state, I'd suggest they offer ambitious proposals on the environment.

How Green Party Gains Could Make Europe a Leader Again on Climate | Yale360 |
The extremist Green party is trying to overthrow capitalism | City AM - London |

City AM Newspaper: One of the founders, Leonid Rozhetskin, disappeared in 2008 and was confirmed dead in 2013. His body was found in a Latvian forest.

Global Warming - distance between America and Europe is steadily increasing.

by Oui on Mon Jul 29th, 2019 at 06:20:09 AM EST
[ Parent ]
"Everybody complains about the weather, but nobody does anything about it."
     --Charles Dudley Warner and/or Mark Twain
by asdf on Mon Jul 29th, 2019 at 02:28:24 PM EST
[ Parent ]
When it was possible to maintain the illusion that the pie was still growing, having "managers" mattered because everyone could pretend the pie was growing due to "management", and the billionaires' piles were growing due to "management".  Now the pie is shrinking, the illusion is circling the drain, and it is more important to distract, to provide the circus to hide the lack of bread.
by rifek on Fri Jul 26th, 2019 at 09:00:52 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I tend to take almost all politician's talk with a large grain of salt, but what they do can be a lot more instructive. So far De Pfeffle has sacked 17 ministers, many of whom didn't even bother to wait to be sacked, they couldn't stomach working for him. And then he has the gall to announce that he has selected a cabinet of all talents and that his prime goal is to unify the country...

But perhaps his most significant appointment - along with Raab as his deputy - is that of Dominic Cummings as his "senior adviser". As you say it means that he is in permanent campaign mode and that policies and EU negotiations don't matter. Expect to see an outraged De Pfeffle go to the country when the EU refuses to lie down and die, and Parliament fails to support his latest wheeze.

That is when the UK will face the greatest test of its somewhat crude democracy. De Pfeffle will try to crush the Brexit Party but can Labour and the Lib Dems agree an electoral pact where the party in third place in the 2017 election withdraws its candidate in a particular constituency in favour of the party in second place?

An electoral pact doesn't imply complete policy alignment or an attempt at coalition building, but simply an attempt to get over the vagaries of a FPTP system where a party with 25% of the vote can win the seat if the other main parties in a multi-party system share the vote evenly enough to ensure no one reaches 25%.

At the moment based on current opinion polls and discounting the current Tory and Lib Dem new leader bounces, it would not be unreasonable to surmise that the party vote shares in the Next General elections would be something like: Tories, 25%, Labour 25%, Lib Dems 20%, Brexit 15%, Greens 8% and others 7%.

Crazy as it may seem, that could be sufficient for a Labour party overall majority if Labour and Lib Dems didn't run candidates against each other in winnable constituencies and agreed to campaign locally on behalf of the candidate whose party was in second place last time around. The Liberals would also stand a reasonable chance of becoming the largest opposition party. Both would therefore have a powerful incentive to form a pact in order to defeat a no-deal Brexit.

But would they have the vision and organisational cohesion to do so? Would narrow party self-interest and the actions of disgruntled deselected but no hope candidates in particular constituencies be sufficient to hand victory to the default no-deal Brexit option? Is disgust with De Pfeffle and fear of no deal sufficient to unite the opposition? A real test of British politics and democracy awaits...

Index of Frank's Diaries

by Frank Schnittger (mail Frankschnittger at hot male dotty communists) on Fri Jul 26th, 2019 at 10:23:26 AM EST
As I suggest above, I think Pfeffle's intention is to fuel great outrage re <the EU's arrogant rejection of his sincere proposals>, and thus steal the thunder of the Brexit Party. Tories up to 30% and Brexit P down to 10% would change the picture.

But yes, a Lib-Lab electoral pact is in any case necessary, if only for the sake of a democracy-as-we-know-it on which to base the real fight back against the billionaire wreckers.

Things are going to slide, slide in all directions
Won't be nothing
Nothing you can measure anymore
L. Cohen

by john_evans (john(dot)evans(dot)et(at)gmail(dot)com) on Fri Jul 26th, 2019 at 11:56:19 AM EST
[ Parent ]
You know the English psyche better than I, and especially potential Tory voters, but I don't sense any great tactical awareness amongst those I do know. The meme "the EU made me do it" or EU intransigence forced me to call a general election hardly holds much water for De Pfeffle in any case, as his idea of negotiation seems to consist of shouting across the channel.

I can't see many working class Leave voters, especially ex-Labour voters, switching from the Farage to De Pfeffle in any case. A lot depends on how De Pfeffle conducts himself in office, but can a large swathe of the electorate really be convinced he sincerely tried to get a deal?  And if no deal is his pitch, why vote De Pfeffle rather than Farage?

If there is any truth in the meme that a large part of the Leave vote was an anti-establishment, anti austerity, anti immigration vote how can De Pfeffle attract it if he is quintessentially part of the establishment, part of Tory governments which enforced austerity, and doesn't want to set quotas or targets for immigration?

I can see how old Tories might want to vote for him, but everyone else?

Index of Frank's Diaries

by Frank Schnittger (mail Frankschnittger at hot male dotty communists) on Fri Jul 26th, 2019 at 01:01:00 PM EST
[ Parent ]
can a large swathe of the electorate really be convinced he sincerely tried to get a deal?

A large swathe of the electorate is informed by billionaire-owned media and fakes on social networks, and have shown to date a remarkable propensity for believing any nonsense that is thrown at them.

he is quintessentially part of the establishment

We see him as that, I think large numbers of people don't. He's a dab hand at scrambling his image.

Whether he'll succeed, I don't know. But even today's news confirms my belief that he will seek to get the EU door shut in his face as rapidly as possible. He'll then have three months in which to attempt to swing Brexiteer voters behind him. In which his advantage over Farage is that he's actually in Number 10 and can deliver the wished-for goods.

Things are going to slide, slide in all directions
Won't be nothing
Nothing you can measure anymore
L. Cohen

by john_evans (john(dot)evans(dot)et(at)gmail(dot)com) on Fri Jul 26th, 2019 at 01:47:39 PM EST
[ Parent ]
For a summary of the latest in Pfeffle's approach to discussions with the EU, see Oui's post here.

It wouldn't take much malice to see him as trolling them. In fact...

Things are going to slide, slide in all directions
Won't be nothing
Nothing you can measure anymore
L. Cohen

by john_evans (john(dot)evans(dot)et(at)gmail(dot)com) on Fri Jul 26th, 2019 at 02:02:11 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Battling Boris won't divide us, Barnier warns the Brexiteers - Extra.ie
A phone call between outgoing European Commission President Jean Claude Juncker and Mr Johnson yesterday afternoon offered little in the way of a breakthrough.

An EC statement following the call said Mr Juncker congratulated the new PM on his `appointment' and `reaffirmed his commitment to working together in the best possible way'.

Shorter Juncker: Who's the "unelected leader"?

by Bernard on Fri Jul 26th, 2019 at 07:11:10 PM EST
[ Parent ]
that Pfeffle knows all about, along with his adviser Dominic Cummings:

Instead of stuffing an ideology down people's throats via TV and radio, a spin doctor has to tailor different messages to different social media groups.

A country of 20 million, the chatty digital director of Vote Leave, Thomas Borwick, told me, needs 70 to 80 types of targeted message. Borwick's job is to connect individual causes to his campaign, even if that connection might feel somewhat tenuous at first.

In the case of the vote to leave the EU, Borwick, who seems to approach such challenges like a Rubik's Cube, claimed that the most successful message in getting people out to vote had been about animal rights. Vote Leave argued that the EU was cruel to animals because, for example, it supported farmers in Spain who raise bulls for bullfighting. And within the "animal rights" segment Borwick could focus even tighter, sending graphic ads featuring mutilated animals to one type of voter and more gentle ads with pictures of cuddly sheep to others.

I'd heard of similarly varied messaging used by spin doctors across the world. The challenge with this sort of micro-targeting is that it requires some big, empty identity to unite all these different groups, something so broad these voters can project themselves on to it - a category such as "the people" or "the many". The "populism" that is thus created is not a sign of "the people" coming together in a great groundswell of unity, but is actually a consequence of the people being more fractured than ever, of their barely existing as one nation. When people have less in common than before, you have to create a new version of "the people" for every election. As too many concrete policies and coherent ideologies would risk alienating parts, these pop-up people need to be united around a leader's personality and a vague feeling, such as "take back control" or "optimism". Facts are a hindrance rather than a help: you are not trying to win a rational debate with floating voters; you want to say whatever gets more attention in fragmented social media groups, where the more outrageous you are the more likes you'll get. Indeed there is something of a rush in throwing a middle finger up to facts, farting at glum reality. Trump and Johnson are both products of this environment.

Identify the hot buttons (animal rights, climate "scepticism", ecologists are fascists, etc) of different groups of people, hook them into a larger narrative around some vague aspiration unconnected with reality : this was always to some extent the MO of politicians on the hustings. But it's now a cyberworld-scale industry that really works. Which Pfeffle has reason to know.


Things are going to slide, slide in all directions
Won't be nothing
Nothing you can measure anymore
L. Cohen

by john_evans (john(dot)evans(dot)et(at)gmail(dot)com) on Sat Jul 27th, 2019 at 03:20:55 PM EST
[ Parent ]
is an Advertising 101, channel placement and value proposition solution for economic waste. Y'all like efficiency, dontcha.

When I started out in the '80s, a large agency (national or global footprint) could easily commission focus group assays in "major markets" (say, metro-areas > 1M) to estimate preferences on any topic ("hot button" a/k/a pain-point a/k/a value proposition) among representative respondents (src = census data, periodical and newspaper circulation, NIELSEN feedback, proprietary market intelligence, etc). Agency compiles data, recommends media mssg and buys to advertiser, collects vig.

The only thing that has changed in the methodology over the past 30+ years is (1) sample size (n) response speed provided by internet telecom (2) redundancy and (3) names of the players --agencies, advertisers, market segment a/k/a target market a/k/a social media group. A "5000 data point" claim for each and every person with a phone is vainglorious reach for "value added."

I tried to watch Netflix documentary "The Big Hack" but fell asleep repeatedly. This ...material purports to reveal the nefarious objectives (revenue) and clientele (advertiser) of Cambridge Analytica (agency)  operations in the UK and USA. But the only news (to me) in the director's nominee for anti-hero, Brittany KAISER. Kaiser reportedly learned everything she knows in the last decade, from internship with the Obama campaign. She ascribes to herself kudos for identifying a NEW! segment "persuadables." Now she's appalled with herself having taken the $$ to support her infirm parents.

Communication isn't a problem. The message isn't even a problem. Isn't the problem more likely than not the people who don't know what they want, whether shoe or government?


Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.

by Cat on Sat Jul 27th, 2019 at 04:17:11 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The point seems to me to be that social media groups are identified who do know what they want, or at least who hold a strong belief that they know what they want. Animal rights, for example, can unleash passionate violence in people. The trick then is to persuade those people, by fine-grained delivery of ads, that what they want is part of some more general scheme. Force-feeding geese and bull-fighting are evil, they are permitted in Europe, therefore the EU is evil, I am going to vote for Brexit.

Otherwise, you're right that the methods used are fundamentally those the advertising industry has been using for over half a century. The difference in speed and fine-grained delivery doesn't create a new paradigm, it does, however, up the game enormously. To the point where one may fairly say, this is a whole new ball game.

Things are going to slide, slide in all directions
Won't be nothing
Nothing you can measure anymore
L. Cohen

by john_evans (john(dot)evans(dot)et(at)gmail(dot)com) on Sun Jul 28th, 2019 at 07:41:31 AM EST
[ Parent ]
More on how this works in this interesting article about a close friend of Pfeffle's:

Revealed: Johnson ally's firm secretly ran Facebook propaganda network

Things are going to slide, slide in all directions
Won't be nothing
Nothing you can measure anymore
L. Cohen

by john_evans (john(dot)evans(dot)et(at)gmail(dot)com) on Fri Aug 2nd, 2019 at 08:55:14 AM EST
[ Parent ]
A Lib-Lab pact is extremely unlikely as, philosophically, they no longer have much in common.

The Lib-Dems have been on a rightward track ever since the OrangeBook tendency emerged 15-20 years ago. Nowadays they are really a version of the Tory-left rather than the Labour right. A Labour right which has itelf been serially humilated in its attempts to unseat Corbyn.

Labour themselves have also moved away fromh thethe historic LibDems position, let alone where they are these days, and Jo Swinson, the new LDP leader, has made it clear that she will have no talks of pacts or agreements whilst Corbyn, or any likely repacement, are in charge.

Indeed, as Boris pushes the Tories increasingly into brexit party territory, it's likely that there will be a series of break points that will push those few sensible conservative MPs to consider jumping ship into an idealogically satisfactory berths in the LibDems. Rory Stewart, who ran a well regarded, if quickly ended, tilt at the Tory leadership himself seems to have gone off walking in the Lake District for consultation with his electorate and consideration of his options, which I think is code for thinking about jumping ship. His leaving would be a huge coup for the LibDems.

there is nothing for either party in a pact. The LibDems electoral pitch is to the sensible right, trade and manfacturing rather than finance. Labour are pushing hard for the precariat. They are on different planets and ther are few points of contact.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Fri Jul 26th, 2019 at 05:27:59 PM EST
[ Parent ]
the electorate is informed by billionaire-owned media and fakes on social networks

And as the Guardian has reported this morning, Dominic Cummings' merry men are already trying out their strategy on Facebook

by oldremainmer48 on Fri Jul 26th, 2019 at 02:03:41 PM EST
After three wasted years, the real negotiations with the European Union will begin.

I'm probably mistaken, but isn't the EU team responsible for any such negotiations disbanded? Or at least on holiday? It might be a bit difficult for BoJo's hard-headed and serious negotiating team to find somebody to talk with.

But in any case, the good news is that the US of A is eager to help the UK after they leave the EU. We are ready to step into the breach and negotiate a sensational US-UK trade deal. We have the best negotiators, we have the best food and the best medicine and the best tariffs. Only the best, in fact!

Relationship with Trump will be 'sensational', says top diplomat

by asdf on Fri Jul 26th, 2019 at 03:30:16 PM EST
The negotiations on the Withdrawal Agreement took near on three years and were completed, the agreement drawn up and presented to the UK Parliament, that three times rejected it.

If the process is currently stalled, it's hardly the EU's fault.

Things are going to slide, slide in all directions
Won't be nothing
Nothing you can measure anymore
L. Cohen

by john_evans (john(dot)evans(dot)et(at)gmail(dot)com) on Fri Jul 26th, 2019 at 04:27:19 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Ah yes, but De Pfeffle isn't going to be talking to some jumped up bureaucrats in Brussels. His negotiating will be done with his peers - Trump, Merkel, Macron - perhaps at a conference similar to that at Yalta after the war - Churchill, Stalin, Roosevelt - where the spoils of Brexit will be divided, and the Irish will be so much collateral damage...

Index of Frank's Diaries
by Frank Schnittger (mail Frankschnittger at hot male dotty communists) on Fri Jul 26th, 2019 at 05:42:00 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Am I wrong that this comment is somewhat tongue-in-cheek?

Things are going to slide, slide in all directions
Won't be nothing
Nothing you can measure anymore
L. Cohen
by john_evans (john(dot)evans(dot)et(at)gmail(dot)com) on Fri Jul 26th, 2019 at 05:57:49 PM EST
[ Parent ]
if he is, then comedy revelas a definite truth to the brexiteers mindset. Leavers have noted repeatedly that the Tories have tried to divide and rule the EU by going over the head of the Commission and speaking directly to the leaders of EU countries.

It's not worked yet, but they keep banging their head on the same wall

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Fri Jul 26th, 2019 at 06:56:18 PM EST
[ Parent ]
All true.

Things are going to slide, slide in all directions
Won't be nothing
Nothing you can measure anymore
L. Cohen
by john_evans (john(dot)evans(dot)et(at)gmail(dot)com) on Fri Jul 26th, 2019 at 07:39:52 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Well how else can De Pfeffle emulate his idol Churchill...

Index of Frank's Diaries
by Frank Schnittger (mail Frankschnittger at hot male dotty communists) on Fri Jul 26th, 2019 at 09:19:15 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Amazing idea, strictly neutral territory on the frontier between the EU/NATO and the democratic new republic of Russia 😣

Can resolve some local issues of piracy and prisoner exchange while the 3-some are at it. Sochi would be a bit contentious ...

Yalta beach

I'm certain the white man in his house in Washington DC would be jealous of Boris. Is there a golf course or was the last conference before the Eisenhower/Nixon ticket?

Global Warming - distance between America and Europe is steadily increasing.

by Oui on Fri Jul 26th, 2019 at 06:43:14 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Trump, Merkel, Macron dividing up the spoils at Yalta is one thing, but I don't see why they would invite de Pfeffel??
by fjallstrom on Sun Jul 28th, 2019 at 09:58:32 AM EST
[ Parent ]

The markets were relieved by the appointment of former Deutsche Bank Sajid Javid as finance chief. The pound held steady against the dollar and euro as traders waited for Johnson's first policy moves.
GBP:EUR

GBP:USD

Johnson boasts a friendship with Trump that his doubters criticise but supporters say could boost Britain's chances of clinching a post-Brexit trade deal with the United States.


Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.
by Cat on Fri Jul 26th, 2019 at 06:03:18 PM EST
[ Parent ]
`This is not about a return to empire' - US Congressman warns Johnson on Belfast Agreement - Irish Times
The head of the US congressional committee responsible for trade policy has warned Britain that a trade deal with the United States will not happen if the Belfast Agreement is jeopardised.

Representative Richard Neal said that Congress, and not the US president, writes trade agreements.

by Bernard on Wed Jul 31st, 2019 at 06:48:06 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Congress, and not the US president, writes trade agreements.

Not really. See Articles I and II. Dude's grasp of US common law on this issue is as week as his grasp of "privacy" all the way up to the POTUS.

's all good. Entertainment from most ignorant, litigious nation on planet will ensue--culminating in "certainty," rule of law, executive enforcement and wtf.

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.

by Cat on Wed Jul 31st, 2019 at 07:17:17 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Ways and Means "responsible" for trade policy ....

Indeed the executive does the trade negotiations:

Mission of USTR

Global Warming - distance between America and Europe is steadily increasing.

by Oui on Wed Jul 31st, 2019 at 07:35:04 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Might de Pheffel have two brick walls to encounter?   (Guardian)

A lot depends on whether the Trump administraton can maintain that it has expedited authority to negotiate trade deals and that this authority includes any new deal with the UK. I don't know what that status is at present, but, with the Irish Question at the fore, Trump would find it hard to get such authority over the opposition of the Friends of Ireland caucus.

Any future US-UK trade deal would almost certainly be blocked by the US Congress if Brexit affects the Irish border and jeopardises peace in Northern Ireland, congressional leaders and diplomats have warned.

Boris Johnson has presented a trade deal with the US as a way of offsetting the economic costs of leaving the EU, and Donald Trump promised the two countries could strike "a very substantial trade agreement" that would increase trade "four or five times".

Trump, however, would not be able to push an agreement through a hostile Congress, where there would be strong bipartisan opposition to any UK trade deal in the event of a threat to the 1998 Good Friday agreement, and to the open border between Northern Ireland and the Republic.


Details of the opposition:
"The American dimension to the Good Friday agreement is indispensable," said Richard Neal, who is co-chair of the 54-strong Friends of Ireland caucus in Congress, and also chairs the powerful House ways and means committee, with the power to hold up a trade deal indefinitely.

"We oversee all trade agreements as part of our tax jurisdiction," Neal, a Democratic congressman from Massachusetts, said in a phone interview. He pointed out that such a complex trade deal could take four or five years, even without the Northern Ireland issue.

"I would have little enthusiasm for entertaining a bilateral trade agreement with the UK, if they were to jeopardise the agreement."

Pete King, the Republican co-chair of the Friends of Ireland group, said the threat to abandon the backstop and endanger the open border was a "needless provocation", adding that his party would have no compunction about defying Trump over the issue.

"I would think anyone who has a strong belief in Northern Ireland and the Good Friday agreement the open border would certainly be willing to go against the president," King said.

At the very least this might add uncertainty to the prospect of a quick bilateral trade agreement. And, in any case, such an agreement is highly unlikely until after 2020, when any authority Trump might now have on trade would likely expire.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."

by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Wed Jul 31st, 2019 at 10:22:12 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I also doubt that Trump will have much appetite for antagonising the Irish community at large, at least before the election. He appears dedicated to infuriating African-Americans, considering no doubt that their vote is lost to him anyway. But the Irish, not so sure.

Things are going to slide, slide in all directions
Won't be nothing
Nothing you can measure anymore
L. Cohen
by john_evans (john(dot)evans(dot)et(at)gmail(dot)com) on Thu Aug 1st, 2019 at 05:55:38 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Numerically, Trump's squad has been very Irish.
by das monde on Thu Aug 1st, 2019 at 06:41:52 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Not only that, but, much as it shames me to admit it, the Irish American vote has been trending increasingly Republican, and even Trumpista in recent years. It is also possibly the most organised national lobby in the USA after the Zionists. AFAIK Hispanics don't tend to lobby for Spain, or Afro-Americans for African states, but the Irish lobby takes an active interest in Irish affairs and lobby accordingly.

Hence St. Patrick's day parades and White House ceremonials are one of the most important days on the US Political calendar. The English "special relationship" with the USA, on the other hand, is more of an elite and ideological thing, and thus doesn't have as much heft at the polling booths. During the Troubles, UK Diplomats regularly expressed frustration with their inability to prevent Gerry Adams et al fund-raising in the USA, and even having access to the White House.

I don't know enough about US political demographics to be definitive, but I suspect the Irish American vote was pivotal in enabling Trump win key swing States. His current net approval ratings in states he carried in 2016 are Pennsylvania (-7), Wisconsin (-13), Michigan (-12), Iowa (-12), North Carolina (-4), and Florida (0). Many of these states also have heavy concentrations of Americans claiming Irish roots:

In total 36M Americans claim Irish ancestry compared to 27M who claim English, but the English are predominately not located in Swing states.

Index of Frank's Diaries

by Frank Schnittger (mail Frankschnittger at hot male dotty communists) on Thu Aug 1st, 2019 at 09:33:52 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Shame on you for posting that spurious representation of US origin stories, when the map supplied with the article suffices to illustrate purported approval of the current executive racist.

Morning Consult interactive map of survey responses (2017-2019), published with Business Insider [!], "Trump's approval rating is underwater in 8 major 2020 battleground states, and it's a troubling sign for his reelection prospects"

Let me put some useless, self-aggrandizing historicism in perspective. When, I was young and attending a venerable private day-school in Grosse Pointe Shores, MI, my 6th grade Social Studies teacher (for we now observed classroom periods in prep for high school) assigned his class of 22 personal genealogy. We were to report an oral narrative, family portraiture, and authentic or imaginary heraldic shield.

More or less, on the due date, one in 3 claimed origin by Mayflower transport and 2 in 3 descendance from Ireland, Scotland, France, Germany, wholly or in part, combined at least one Cherokee antecedent. The whole junior high school cohort numbered about 300, of which I was one of 4 who fit neither pattern for reasons that should be crystal fucking clear.

I bear this in mind to this day in order to reiterate. In the decades since I'm hardly surprised to find at least two in any room, claiming a union of pilgrims with Irish and Cherokee grannies for their totems. In the absence of contradictory narratives (which the "central registry" stores), US people change wardrobe by phase of the moon and wind velocity. Which is to say, where the "Irish" are isn't on a map of this federal-republic or Andrew Jackson's grisly militias, 1812-1845

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.

by Cat on Fri Aug 2nd, 2019 at 07:43:03 PM EST
[ Parent ]
But if Frank is right about the influence on voting patterns, all that matters is that they think they are Irish. Whether they are really Irish or not doesn't matter.
by gk (gk (gk quattro due due sette @gmail.com)) on Fri Aug 2nd, 2019 at 10:39:56 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Frank has forgotten all about "Anglo Disease". Mission accomplished.

In the US HH income and wealth "influences" candidates. State electoral administration proscribes "voter patterns". (When's the last time Irish-Americans litigated voting rights as a class?) HH income and wealth predicts voter preference for a candidate  regardless of party affiliation or country of origin. That trait is only captured by Census and Dept. of State instruments from noncitizens/"lawfully" resident aliens. They cannot vote.

That "ancestry" map appears quite the exploit of expanded "race or ethnicity" queries first introduced to C2000 self-reporting. There's no telling if this source/"estimate" is original or derivative work product. It's been scrubbed. Rlly?

19,094,109 Americans are found mostly in the South East (people select this ancestry either as a political statement or because their pre-American [?!] ancestry is uncertain).

Self-perception of moribund "nationality", e.g. Scotch-Irish, among US persons of European persuasion is dubious. That was demonstrated quite dramatically by a 23&Me DNA population report, iirc, 2014, 2015. I shared a true story to demo: immigrant entry in the US is the basis of political status.

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.

by Cat on Sat Aug 3rd, 2019 at 02:18:33 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Him.

He's a Class-A dick whose parochial racism (Albany -  NYC) and national scheming has only recently been somewhat moderated by age (75) and competition for market making, confounded by ignorant MSM elevation of the piker Steve KING (IA-4, FFS) to ignominy.

Long Island (R), NY-2, cradle to grave of my own dearly departed Robert, issue of Hard (G5) and Quinn (G2). King and his fraternal twin Schumer (formerly NY-16, "Five Towns") are heirs of master opportunist D'Amato (R).

MSM is no guide to the network of gangster intrigues and smug fraternal orders, bundling LI.

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.

by Cat on Fri Aug 2nd, 2019 at 06:00:18 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I forgot to say, there is no "opposition" to Trump. To paraphrase an insult, MSM quibbles about price.

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.
by Cat on Fri Aug 2nd, 2019 at 06:03:21 PM EST
[ Parent ]
James Meek in the London Review of Books:

 It's a charming received idea that we can suddenly mend the political divide the 2016 referendum opened up - by leaving the EU, or by getting a million-odd voters to vote the other way in a second referendum. But what then happens to the cultural-political strands that seem, with apologies to the good consciences of socialist and liberal Leavers, such reliable markers of Leave sentiment? Unquestioning patriotism, nativism, belief in white British supremacy, fear of Muslims, bring-backery, the search for traitors, faith privileged over evidence, ersatz imperial nostalgia, exaggerated expectations of familial favours from the white rulers of ex-colonies, climate change scepticism, the yearning for a return to the gender and racial stereotypes of forty years ago, the belief that `civil servant' and `corrupt, meddling bureaucrat' are synonyms, the glorification of the British military? Are they really just strands of a particular Ukip/right-wing Tory mindset that will, after the resolution of the referendum vote, unravel and shrink back into the minority of individuals who harbour them?



Things are going to slide, slide in all directions
Won't be nothing
Nothing you can measure anymore
L. Cohen
by john_evans (john(dot)evans(dot)et(at)gmail(dot)com) on Fri Jul 26th, 2019 at 06:40:37 PM EST
yes, worrying questions. I'm not sure that anybody has any good answers whilst the right wing tabloids keep pouring fuel on the fire

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Fri Jul 26th, 2019 at 06:53:51 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Cometh the Hour, Cometh the Man: A Profile of Boris Johnson
(by Toby Young)
His lack of preparedness seemed less like evidence of his own shortcomings as a debater and more a way of sending up all the other speakers, as well as the pomposity of the proceedings. You got the sense that he could easily have delivered a highly effective speech if he'd wanted to, but was too clever and sophisticated - and honest - to enter into such a silly charade. To do what the other debaters were doing, and pretend he believed what was coming out of his mouth, would have been patronising. Everyone else was taking the audience for fools, but not him. He was openly insincere and, in being so, somehow seemed more authentic than everyone else.

[...] While the rest of us were works-in-progress, vainly trying on different personae, Boris was the finished article.

by das monde on Sun Jul 28th, 2019 at 12:28:30 PM EST
An enthusiastic leavers view of Boris (fan boi edition).

Everybody keeps saying that boris is ferociously intelligent, yet evidence for this remains elusive. He's certainly clever, can play a crowd and certainly knows how to push right wing buttons effectively. But that is far from an uncommon talent, and even a dumbass like Trump covers most of that.

Being more intelligent than Toby Young seems to be the key to this article, but that is far from being a mark of great accomplishment.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sun Jul 28th, 2019 at 04:46:31 PM EST
[ Parent ]
So Boris missed his ultimate goal to be King of the World ... he could have chosen to run for Office of U.S. President ... I would prefer him above the present resident. His deviance to seek out Brexit as political aim will certainly get Boris a ranking between Caligula - Claudius - Nero. None of it will be of benefit to the majority of the English who voted to Leave ... a sad chapter for citizens of Europe and a decade of uncertainty. 😒

Global Warming - distance between America and Europe is steadily increasing.
by Oui on Sun Jul 28th, 2019 at 04:55:47 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Don't even mention the poorly defined requirements for being elected POTUS. There are scenarios where BoJo could get in.
by asdf on Mon Jul 29th, 2019 at 03:08:35 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Well given he was born in New York, De Pfeffel is entitled to run for US President. What better way to do so than to start as PM of an eastern state and bring it from a European sphere of influence into a US one. With Trump's support he can then become US secretary of State and run for President after Trump's second term. Shure don't the amurkins love the posh British accent?

Index of Frank's Diaries
by Frank Schnittger (mail Frankschnittger at hot male dotty communists) on Tue Jul 30th, 2019 at 12:24:21 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Art. II
No person except a natural born citizen, or a citizen of the United States, at the time of the adoption of this Constitution, shall be eligible to the office of President; neither shall any person be eligible to that office who shall not have attained to the age of thirty five years, and been fourteen Years a resident within the United States.
Complicated 18th century English notwithstanding, BoJo will need to relocate his domicile and register to vote before he's ready to nominate himself to the uniparty.

Also, he should bring a wad of dough to feed attys.

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.

by Cat on Tue Jul 30th, 2019 at 11:55:04 AM EST
[ Parent ]
He renounced his US citizenship a couple of years ago, and to regain it would have to start over as a new immigrant. Whether that would count as "natural born" or not is undefined. Or he could get himself an American girlfriend and leverage the spousal rules like certain first ladies.

Also, note that those 18th Century commas are what allow us to shoot each other at will. "A well-regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed." Very clear innit.

by asdf on Tue Jul 30th, 2019 at 01:27:45 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Even giving the commas a miss, the major obfuscation (for today, and to a fair extent even at the time of the framing of the Constitution), lies in the word "people".

Voters, and members of the militia, were white adult land-owning males. Or white, adult, land-owning males.

Things are going to slide, slide in all directions
Won't be nothing
Nothing you can measure anymore
L. Cohen

by john_evans (john(dot)evans(dot)et(at)gmail(dot)com) on Tue Jul 30th, 2019 at 02:11:04 PM EST
[ Parent ]
City to ban gendered language like "manhole," "manpower" and "firemen"
An ordinance on gender neutral language, introduced by council member Rigel Robinson in March, was passed on Tuesday night, CBS San Francisco reports.

"In recent years, broadening societal awareness of transgender and gendernonconforming identities has brought to light the importance of non-binary gender inclusivity," Robinson's ordinance reads. "Therefore, it is both timely and necessary to make the environment of City Hall and the language of city legislation consistent with the principles of inclusion."

Gender-neutral emendments of the code, of which "people"

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.
by Cat on Tue Jul 30th, 2019 at 04:38:58 PM EST
[ Parent ]
introduced by council member Rigel Robinson in March
by gk (gk (gk quattro due due sette @gmail.com)) on Tue Jul 30th, 2019 at 06:12:59 PM EST
[ Parent ]
So Toby Young was hugely impressed by Boris at Oxford. But Boris is not all that exceptional. Though most of the outputs of the top public schools are cooky-cutter fake gentlemen like David Cameron, there's room for some eccentricity (we are English for heaven's sake). Off-kilter characters like Boris are not so very rare. In fact, playing the clown as he does, coming up with the apparently dopy but watch-out-I'm-brilliant act Young describes, does not proceed from a sense of insecurity or a need for compensation, but from a sure sense of absolute entitlement. If you can mess around with very high responsibility (as Boris did when Foreign Secretary, and as we may see him do with the premiership), it's because you are so rock-solid certain of your privileged position that it's a second nature. Throw in a smokescreen of silliness and charm, and the arrogance will not appear. An old trick of England's owners.

Toby Young doesn't seem to have learned this while at Oxford. He also doesn't seem to have learned that Eton is a finishing school for highly-entitled shits. The rate of success in turning out finished and polished shits is astounding. That kind of place doesn't cost a bomb for nothing.

Things are going to slide, slide in all directions
Won't be nothing
Nothing you can measure anymore
L. Cohen

by john_evans (john(dot)evans(dot)et(at)gmail(dot)com) on Sun Jul 28th, 2019 at 07:49:08 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Why boarding schools produce bad leaders (Guardian, 2014)

But if progressives want to win emphatically without charisma, they are basically giving up all romantic voters.

by das monde on Mon Jul 29th, 2019 at 07:18:57 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Private schools in the US have a similar problem. The annual total cost of attending a selective private college is upwards of $75,000 per year. Four years of undergraduate studies plus a two more to get the Masters Degree needed for reasonably-paying jobs means you need to come up with close to a half a million bucks.

It is pretty much guaranteed that these students fall into the "privileged" category.

by asdf on Mon Jul 29th, 2019 at 11:50:23 PM EST
[ Parent ]
by Oui on Sun Jul 28th, 2019 at 10:17:11 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I'm going to go out on a limb here (then saw it off behind me)

I postulate that Alex de P is the only person on the UK political scene with a coherent exit strategy from the Brexit débâcle.

The plan is clear : huff and puff, and hold a new election, giving a clear Brexit majority. The EU (hypothetically) would then be obliged to re-open negotiations. Parliament would pass a deal resembling the former one, with added lipstick. Job done.

(Remember, the only thing that thwarted May's Brexit is that she had apparently assumed [or hoped] that she could push it through without consulting parliament...)

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II

by eurogreen on Tue Jul 30th, 2019 at 10:07:01 AM EST
tbh it's not the deal that is the problem, that would be the Irish backstop. This exists to ensure that the International Treaty signed by the UK and the Republic, overseen by the United States and the United Nations, is honooured by ensuring that there will be an open border between the Republic and the UK.

The deal is about the political severance. Then we enter into negotiations about the trading relationships and the backstop says that, in order to preserve the open border, tariffs on either side of the border must remain the same until such time as an alternative agreement exists. If Ulster leaves the EU as part of the UK, then it follows that either Ulster stays within the EU tariff zone while Britain (ie England, Scotland and Wales) go off and do their thing or the whole of the UK remains in the tariff zone (and unable to do separate trading deals).

this makes the backstop, which is a legal requirement under international treaty into a poison pill for the Tories. They don't really care about Ulster all that much, despite their wittering on about the Union, but they do care about the votes of the DUP in Westminster.

And that's why Boris is determined to end the backstop, not the deal itself. But the backstop is the non-negotiable part which is not really in the gift of the EU to waive.

It's the ultimate Eton boys bluff. They think that speaking slowly and loudly means that they can get what they want, rules are just for little people, not bold-world conquerors like english public school Oxford graduates. Seize the day !!! They don't like it up 'em. etc etc.

This works in Westminster and to a lesser extent in Washington. It cuts no ice whatsoever in Brussels, which annoys them immensely and is part of the reason they want to leave.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Tue Jul 30th, 2019 at 10:43:37 AM EST
[ Parent ]
sorry, first para should end...

honoured by ensuring that there will be an open border between the Republic and Ulster.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Tue Jul 30th, 2019 at 12:13:01 PM EST
[ Parent ]
"It cuts no ice whatsoever in Brussels..." Check back in October after the EU gives another extension.

Boris has a perfectly good strategy, which is to use no-deal Brexit as a way to ride into the history books. Regardless of whether it is a huge success or a complete fiasco, he will show up as the PM who confronted Europe. Theresa May will be a footnote, along with Cameron and whats-his-name and that other one.  

by asdf on Tue Jul 30th, 2019 at 01:32:30 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Giving another extension has already been mooted on the EU side. However, it is not the same thing as accepting to do away with the backstop.

To obtain that, Pfeffle would have to demonstrate exactly how his alternative system would operate. For the moment, 1) he has no alternative system on offer, 2) he is refusing to enter discussions unless the EU first agrees to pull the backstop from the agreement.

That is a recipe for no discussion and no deal. The notion that the EU would sign an agreement in which no watertight arrangement was provided for in respect of the border of the free market and customs union, and of the particular needs of the island of Ireland, is unicornical.

Things are going to slide, slide in all directions
Won't be nothing
Nothing you can measure anymore
L. Cohen

by john_evans (john(dot)evans(dot)et(at)gmail(dot)com) on Tue Jul 30th, 2019 at 02:01:22 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Yes, of course my hypothesis is that Alex's strategy is contingent on the Irish Question. But this is part of the huff and puff. My expectation is that once he has a Conservative-Leave majority, he doesn't need the DUP, and summarily ditches them, and finds the backstop a jolly good idea after all.

How well this flip-flop goes down with electors is immaterial, because he's five years out from the next election (and the list of horrors he will have done by then will be so long that the betrayal of the Unionists will be barely a footnote)

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II

by eurogreen on Tue Jul 30th, 2019 at 02:11:22 PM EST
[ Parent ]
This is pretty much my hypothesis in this diary. What Pfeffle is aiming at is a manageable Tory majority and five years in Number 10 for him.

Things are going to slide, slide in all directions
Won't be nothing
Nothing you can measure anymore
L. Cohen
by john_evans (john(dot)evans(dot)et(at)gmail(dot)com) on Tue Jul 30th, 2019 at 02:17:52 PM EST
[ Parent ]
1) he has no alternative system on offer

Well that's not true.  He has a unicorn stampede scheduled for All Hallows Eve.

by rifek on Tue Jul 30th, 2019 at 03:38:26 PM EST
[ Parent ]
That's his secret weapon. It will strike fear into the (already craven by definition) hearts of the Johnny Foreigners.

Things are going to slide, slide in all directions
Won't be nothing
Nothing you can measure anymore
L. Cohen
by john_evans (john(dot)evans(dot)et(at)gmail(dot)com) on Tue Jul 30th, 2019 at 08:12:15 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Thus spake Piffle of Piff All.
by rifek on Wed Jul 31st, 2019 at 07:27:46 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Or, as he likes to call his ancient seat, Sweet Pfeff 'all.

Things are going to slide, slide in all directions
Won't be nothing
Nothing you can measure anymore
L. Cohen
by john_evans (john(dot)evans(dot)et(at)gmail(dot)com) on Thu Aug 1st, 2019 at 06:01:00 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Don't think for one moment we don't know what you did there... still, you set that one up nicely...:-)

Index of Frank's Diaries
by Frank Schnittger (mail Frankschnittger at hot male dotty communists) on Thu Aug 1st, 2019 at 08:51:36 AM EST
[ Parent ]


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