Welcome to European Tribune. It's gone a bit quiet around here these days, but it's still going.

Energy (and Other) Events Monthly - April 2022

by gmoke Mon Apr 4th, 2022 at 01:22:36 AM EST

These kinds of events below are happening all over the world every day and most of them, now, are webcast and archived, sometimes even with accurate transcripts. Would be good to have a place that helped people access them. These kinds of events below are happening all over the world every day and most of them, now, are webcast and archived, sometimes even with accurate transcripts. Would be good to have a place that helped people access them.

This is a more global version of the local listings I did for about a decade (what I did and why I did it at http://hubeventsnotes.blogspot.com/2013/11/what-i-do-and-why-i-do-it.html) until September 2020 and earlier for a few years in the 1990s (https:/theworld.com~gmoke/AList.index.html).  

A more comprehensive global listing service could be developed if there were enough people interested in doing it, if it hasn't already been done.  

If anyone knows whether such a global listing of open energy, climate, and other events is available, please put me in contact.

Thanks for reading,

Solar IS Civil Defense,
George Mokray
gmoke@world.std.com

http://hubeventsnotes.blogspot.com - notes on lectures and books
http://solarray.blogspot.com - renewable energy and efficiency
https:/zeronetenrg.blogspot.com - zero net energy links list
http://cityag.blogspot.com - city agriculture links list
http://geometrylinks.blogspot.com - geometry links list
http://hubevents.blogspot.com - Energy (and Other) Events
http://www.dailykos.com/user/gmoke/history - articles, ideas, and screeds

------------
Conferences
------------

Migration Summit
Monday, April 4 - April 29, 2022

Virtual Event
The Migration Summit 2022, organized by the MIT Refugee Action Hub (ReACT), Na'amal, Karam Foundation and the MIT Abdul Latif Jameel World Education Lab (J-WEL), is a month-long global convening designed to build bridges between diverse communities of displaced learners, universities, companies, nonprofits and NGOs, social enterprises, foundations, philanthropists, researchers, policy makers, employers and governments around the key challenges and opportunities for refugee and migrant communities.  The Migration Summit in April 2022 will explore this year's theme "Education and Workforce Development in Displacement" through virtual and in-person events hosted by participating partners around the world.

Visit https:react.mit.edu/migrationsummit to register and to read the full event description.

----------------

Living Climate Futures
Friday, April 22 - April 23
MIT Campus, Various Locations

Living Climate Futures culminates in a two-day symposium of events and activities, April 22-23.

Some events are open to the public and require Tim Tickets (see FAQ).

Others are for the MIT community (preference to students) and community partners only.

Full Description: https:/livingclimatefutures.org

Friday, April 22
11:00 AM - 1:00 PM
Virtual visit with Chicago high school student activists
3:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Indigenous Earth Day at MIT
Saturday, April 23
9:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Environmental Justice + Climate Resilience Tours
2:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Community Partner Panel Discussion + Youth Forum
(all details subject to change - sign up for each event in Eventbrite to get updates)

----------------

TEDxMIT
Saturday, April 23
Stata Center
https:
tedxboston.com/upcoming-events

_____

MIT Sloan New Space Age Conference 2022
Friday, April 29
MIT Media Lab, 75 Amherst Street, Building E14 - 6th Floor, Cambridge
Tickets now available: http://newspaceage.org/
Cost:  $10 - $175

A student-led event at MIT Sloan.

MIT's Astropreneurship & Space Industry Club is proud to host the seventh annual New Space Age Conference as a platform to advance growth of the private space industry. 2022 speakers will discuss new technologies and services being implemented to close the business case for the emerging space economy. Join students, academics, and industry professionals to learn more !

_____

2022 Hybrid Interfaith Summit - Together in Climate Chaos; Interfaith Solidarity for Climate Resilient Communities; an Interfaith Summit on How to Respond to Climate Change
May 1
4pm-6pm
zoom and in person
Native American Indian Center of Boston, 105 South Huntington Avenue, Jamaica Plain, MA 02130. You have a choice of either attending in-person, or virtually on zoom.
RSVP at https:/us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZElc-yqqTgjEtBaSf15bzUUptAuOCnu5Hzw

In the wake of the National Climate Assessment and UN report in 2021 on the projected serious consequences of unchecked climate change, interfaith leaders from the greater Boston area will come together with Communities Responding to Extreme Weather (CREW) to host the fourth annual interfaith summit.

This now abbreviated summit will focus on the role of faith communities in helping their community members build resilience, whether from future climate impacts such as floods, extreme heat, and severe storms, or more immediate concerns like a pandemic. We will shall share knowledge on the types of changes we are already seeing and can expect to see in the Northeast, discuss practical ways congregations can prepare themselves and their surrounding community, and discern together how our spiritual practices could help sustain not only our efforts, but also our souls, hearts, and minds, as we engage in this most critical mission.

There will be an optional half-hour of networking from 6:00pm-6:30pm on the same zoom line that participants are encouraged but not mandated to attend.

_____
Lecture Series
--------------

Real Organic Book Club
https:
www.realorganicproject.org/real-organic-friends

We are pleased to announce the first several dates for our 2022 Real Friends book club:
Paul Hawken, May 5, 6pm EDT
Anne Bikle, June 2, 6pm EDT
David Montgomery, July 7, 6pm EDT
Vandana Shiva, to be announced
Dan Barber, to be announced

Providing you with the opportunity to engage with these prominent Real Organic board members is just one of the ways we would like to thank you for your ongoing support of our work. The book club meetings should be fun and interesting. It will be a chance to talk with these important thinkers about their work.

------
Events
------

PAOC Colloquium:  Ecological and evolutionary responses to global change across realms
Monday, April 4
12:00pm to 1:00pm
Virtual Event
https:/mit.zoom.us/j/99605116338#success

Malin Pinsky (Rutgers)
The same ecological and evolutionary processes operate across land and sea, and yet ocean life survives in a dramatically different fluid environment. The ocean is, in effect, a 1.3 sextillion liter water bath with muted thermal variation through time and space, limited oxygen, and intense convective and conductive processes. In this talk, I will trace some of the consequences for evolution, physiology, population dynamics, and conservation at sea, including striking contrasts and similarities to patterns on land. I will present evidence that marine animals live closer to their upper thermal limits than do species on land, that marine species have responded faster to temperature change, and that species can but do not universally evolve in response to rapid environmental change. Finally, I will discuss some of the unique conservation challenges these dynamics create for ocean life and potential solutions through proactive ocean planning and by harnessing evolutionary rescue for climate resilience.

About This Event
The PAOC Colloquium is a weekly interdisciplinary seminar series that brings together the whole PAOC community. Seminar topics include all research concerning the physics, chemistry, and biology of the atmospheres, oceans and climate, but also talks about e.g. societal impacts of climatic processes. The seminars take place on Monday from 12-1pm. Contact paoc-colloquium-comm@mit.edu for more information and Zoom password.

--------------

How Do We Think about Population in the Anthropocene?
Monday, April 4
5:00 PM - 6:30 PM
RSVP at https:
www.eventbrite.com/e/alison-bashford-how-do-we-think-about-population-in-the-anthropocene-re gistration-252378048537

Alison Bashford explores first how modern (post c. 1780) population changes have entered discussion on the Anthropocene. Second, she asks how historians specifically, might (not should) begin to answer this question, with attention to both accelerating global net population growth and local population decline. She considers the `Anthropocene' (not, say, `climate change'), since the former is an historical as well as a geological phenomenon, and, it turns out, a familiar one.

Alison Bashford's work traces the fortunes and trends of historical work on global population from the mid-twentieth century into the era when the Anthropocene was named. The catastrophic register of `the population bomb' era, including its connection to ecological sciences and then environmentalist politics, is the immediate antecedent to political responses to the Anthropocene crisis. That much we already know. Here Allison Bashford explores how and why `population' went from center-stage to off-stage. Discussion of population growth and `population control' became highly charged and then became almost unspeakable. For better or worse this was a remarkable success story of and for `critique': of health systems, of political economy, of Cold War geopolitics, variously via feminist studies, race and postcolonial studies, via Marxism and left science studies from the 1970s onwards. After and in the light of that impact, she asks how or whether `population' might productively be considered via a `postcritique' humanities and social sciences, not least bringing historians into that conversation.

Event Speakers
Alison Bashford, Laureate Professor in History at the University of New South Wales
Response by Kavita Sivaramakrishnan, Associate Professor of Sociomedical Sciences at Columbia University
Chaired by Maureen Raymo, Co-Founding Dean of the Climate School at Columbia University

----------------

Delivering on Net Zero
Tuesday, April 5
11 a.m. - 12 p.m.
RSVP at https:
harvard.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_LIzv_Hu7Rr2bFiUg3rYJBg

SPEAKER(S)  Kwasi Kwarteng, UK Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
CONTACT INFO    mrcbg@hks.harvard.edu

----------------

Getting Off Russian Gas: Implications for Germany and Europe
Tuesday, April 5
5:30 - 6:15pm CEST
RSVP at https:
email.gmfus.org/s/4434c98e8e6db288802f00e67ddb3141db242047

Jacob Kirkegaard
Moderator:  Sudha David-Wilp
External Speaker:  Prof. Dr. Veronika Grimm

Before Vladimir Putin's war against Ukraine, allies warned Germany of the risks associated with energy dependence on Russia. Now, Germany and other EU member states are hurriedly seeking ways to replace Russian fossil fuels. In his Zeitenwende speech, Chancellor Olaf Scholz called for a "responsible, forward-looking energy policy," but economic concerns already threaten to thwart his vision. What would be the economic effects for Germany and Europe if they wean themselves off Russian gas sooner rather than later? To discuss this question and more, we will speak with economic experts Veronika Grimm and Jacob Kirkegaard in this month's edition of #TransatlanticTuesdays. Next month, we will cover the military pillar of the Zeitenwende speech.

If you have any questions, please contact Callie Starn at CStarn@gmfus.org.

----------------

This is a more global version of the local listings I did for about a decade (what I did and why I did it at http://hubeventsnotes.blogspot.com/2013/11/what-i-do-and-why-i-do-it.html) until September 2020 and earlier for a few years in the 1990s (https:theworld.com~gmoke/AList.index.html).  

A more comprehensive global listing service could be developed if there were enough people interested in doing it, if it hasn't already been done.  

If anyone knows whether such a global listing of open energy, climate, and other events is available, please put me in contact.

Thanks for reading,

Solar IS Civil Defense,
George Mokray
gmoke@world.std.com

http://hubeventsnotes.blogspot.com - notes on lectures and books
http://solarray.blogspot.com - renewable energy and efficiency
https:/zeronetenrg.blogspot.com - zero net energy links list
http://cityag.blogspot.com - city agriculture links list
http://geometrylinks.blogspot.com - geometry links list
http://hubevents.blogspot.com - Energy (and Other) Events
http://www.dailykos.com/user/gmoke/history - articles, ideas, and screeds

------------
Conferences
------------

Migration Summit
Monday, April 4 - April 29, 2022

Virtual Event
The Migration Summit 2022, organized by the MIT Refugee Action Hub (ReACT), Na'amal, Karam Foundation and the MIT Abdul Latif Jameel World Education Lab (J-WEL), is a month-long global convening designed to build bridges between diverse communities of displaced learners, universities, companies, nonprofits and NGOs, social enterprises, foundations, philanthropists, researchers, policy makers, employers and governments around the key challenges and opportunities for refugee and migrant communities.  The Migration Summit in April 2022 will explore this year's theme "Education and Workforce Development in Displacement" through virtual and in-person events hosted by participating partners around the world.

Visit https:react.mit.edu/migrationsummit to register and to read the full event description.

----------------

Living Climate Futures
Friday, April 22 - April 23
MIT Campus, Various Locations

Living Climate Futures culminates in a two-day symposium of events and activities, April 22-23.

Some events are open to the public and require Tim Tickets (see FAQ).

Others are for the MIT community (preference to students) and community partners only.

Full Description: https:/livingclimatefutures.org

Friday, April 22
11:00 AM - 1:00 PM
Virtual visit with Chicago high school student activists
3:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Indigenous Earth Day at MIT
Saturday, April 23
9:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Environmental Justice + Climate Resilience Tours
2:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Community Partner Panel Discussion + Youth Forum
(all details subject to change - sign up for each event in Eventbrite to get updates)

----------------

TEDxMIT
Saturday, April 23
Stata Center
https:
tedxboston.com/upcoming-events

_____

MIT Sloan New Space Age Conference 2022
Friday, April 29
MIT Media Lab, 75 Amherst Street, Building E14 - 6th Floor, Cambridge
Tickets now available: http://newspaceage.org/
Cost:  $10 - $175

A student-led event at MIT Sloan.

MIT's Astropreneurship & Space Industry Club is proud to host the seventh annual New Space Age Conference as a platform to advance growth of the private space industry. 2022 speakers will discuss new technologies and services being implemented to close the business case for the emerging space economy. Join students, academics, and industry professionals to learn more !

_____

2022 Hybrid Interfaith Summit - Together in Climate Chaos; Interfaith Solidarity for Climate Resilient Communities; an Interfaith Summit on How to Respond to Climate Change
May 1
4pm-6pm
zoom and in person
Native American Indian Center of Boston, 105 South Huntington Avenue, Jamaica Plain, MA 02130. You have a choice of either attending in-person, or virtually on zoom.
RSVP at https:/us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZElc-yqqTgjEtBaSf15bzUUptAuOCnu5Hzw

In the wake of the National Climate Assessment and UN report in 2021 on the projected serious consequences of unchecked climate change, interfaith leaders from the greater Boston area will come together with Communities Responding to Extreme Weather (CREW) to host the fourth annual interfaith summit.

This now abbreviated summit will focus on the role of faith communities in helping their community members build resilience, whether from future climate impacts such as floods, extreme heat, and severe storms, or more immediate concerns like a pandemic. We will shall share knowledge on the types of changes we are already seeing and can expect to see in the Northeast, discuss practical ways congregations can prepare themselves and their surrounding community, and discern together how our spiritual practices could help sustain not only our efforts, but also our souls, hearts, and minds, as we engage in this most critical mission.

There will be an optional half-hour of networking from 6:00pm-6:30pm on the same zoom line that participants are encouraged but not mandated to attend.

_____
Lecture Series
--------------

Real Organic Book Club
https:
www.realorganicproject.org/real-organic-friends

We are pleased to announce the first several dates for our 2022 Real Friends book club:
Paul Hawken, May 5, 6pm EDT
Anne Bikle, June 2, 6pm EDT
David Montgomery, July 7, 6pm EDT
Vandana Shiva, to be announced
Dan Barber, to be announced

Providing you with the opportunity to engage with these prominent Real Organic board members is just one of the ways we would like to thank you for your ongoing support of our work. The book club meetings should be fun and interesting. It will be a chance to talk with these important thinkers about their work.

------
Events
------

PAOC Colloquium:  Ecological and evolutionary responses to global change across realms
Monday, April 4
12:00pm to 1:00pm
Virtual Event
https:/mit.zoom.us/j/99605116338#success

Malin Pinsky (Rutgers)
The same ecological and evolutionary processes operate across land and sea, and yet ocean life survives in a dramatically different fluid environment. The ocean is, in effect, a 1.3 sextillion liter water bath with muted thermal variation through time and space, limited oxygen, and intense convective and conductive processes. In this talk, I will trace some of the consequences for evolution, physiology, population dynamics, and conservation at sea, including striking contrasts and similarities to patterns on land. I will present evidence that marine animals live closer to their upper thermal limits than do species on land, that marine species have responded faster to temperature change, and that species can but do not universally evolve in response to rapid environmental change. Finally, I will discuss some of the unique conservation challenges these dynamics create for ocean life and potential solutions through proactive ocean planning and by harnessing evolutionary rescue for climate resilience.

About This Event
The PAOC Colloquium is a weekly interdisciplinary seminar series that brings together the whole PAOC community. Seminar topics include all research concerning the physics, chemistry, and biology of the atmospheres, oceans and climate, but also talks about e.g. societal impacts of climatic processes. The seminars take place on Monday from 12-1pm. Contact paoc-colloquium-comm@mit.edu for more information and Zoom password.

--------------

How Do We Think about Population in the Anthropocene?
Monday, April 4
5:00 PM - 6:30 PM
RSVP at https:
www.eventbrite.com/e/alison-bashford-how-do-we-think-about-population-in-the-anthropocene-re gistration-252378048537

Alison Bashford explores first how modern (post c. 1780) population changes have entered discussion on the Anthropocene. Second, she asks how historians specifically, might (not should) begin to answer this question, with attention to both accelerating global net population growth and local population decline. She considers the `Anthropocene' (not, say, `climate change'), since the former is an historical as well as a geological phenomenon, and, it turns out, a familiar one.

Alison Bashford's work traces the fortunes and trends of historical work on global population from the mid-twentieth century into the era when the Anthropocene was named. The catastrophic register of `the population bomb' era, including its connection to ecological sciences and then environmentalist politics, is the immediate antecedent to political responses to the Anthropocene crisis. That much we already know. Here Allison Bashford explores how and why `population' went from center-stage to off-stage. Discussion of population growth and `population control' became highly charged and then became almost unspeakable. For better or worse this was a remarkable success story of and for `critique': of health systems, of political economy, of Cold War geopolitics, variously via feminist studies, race and postcolonial studies, via Marxism and left science studies from the 1970s onwards. After and in the light of that impact, she asks how or whether `population' might productively be considered via a `postcritique' humanities and social sciences, not least bringing historians into that conversation.

Event Speakers
Alison Bashford, Laureate Professor in History at the University of New South Wales
Response by Kavita Sivaramakrishnan, Associate Professor of Sociomedical Sciences at Columbia University
Chaired by Maureen Raymo, Co-Founding Dean of the Climate School at Columbia University

----------------

Delivering on Net Zero
Tuesday, April 5
11 a.m. - 12 p.m.
RSVP at https:
harvard.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_LIzv_Hu7Rr2bFiUg3rYJBg

SPEAKER(S)  Kwasi Kwarteng, UK Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
CONTACT INFO    mrcbg@hks.harvard.edu

----------------

Getting Off Russian Gas: Implications for Germany and Europe
Tuesday, April 5
5:30 - 6:15pm CEST
RSVP at https:
/email.gmfus.org/s/4434c98e8e6db288802f00e67ddb3141db242047

Jacob Kirkegaard
Moderator:  Sudha David-Wilp
External Speaker:  Prof. Dr. Veronika Grimm

Before Vladimir Putin's war against Ukraine, allies warned Germany of the risks associated with energy dependence on Russia. Now, Germany and other EU member states are hurriedly seeking ways to replace Russian fossil fuels. In his Zeitenwende speech, Chancellor Olaf Scholz called for a "responsible, forward-looking energy policy," but economic concerns already threaten to thwart his vision. What would be the economic effects for Germany and Europe if they wean themselves off Russian gas sooner rather than later? To discuss this question and more, we will speak with economic experts Veronika Grimm and Jacob Kirkegaard in this month's edition of #TransatlanticTuesdays. Next month, we will cover the military pillar of the Zeitenwende speech.

If you have any questions, please contact Callie Starn at CStarn@gmfus.org.

----------------


Governing the Climate? The Paris Agreement at Work
Wednesday, April 6
8:00 AM to 9:30 AM
RSVP at https:/columbiauniversity.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_qAQ4M7biR0WefGBH-ES5Nw

It has been more than six years since COP 21 was held in Paris in December 2015. We're now able to take a step back, take stock, and ask some important questions about the Paris process: How can very ambitious emissions reduction goals be met by voluntary national commitments? Do commitments translate into transformative policies? What are the most promising mechanisms, initiatives, and developments that could enable developing countries to deliver on ambitious emissions reduction targets? How does the formal regime (post-Paris process) interact with initiatives, actions and commitments from the industrial and financial sectors? How will the aftermath of the invasion of Ukraine impact international climate policy? The Center on Global Energy Policy and the Columbia Global Centers | Paris will host a panel of experts to address these questions, and more.

Moderator:  Pierre Noël, Global Research Scholar, Center on Global Energy Policy at Columbia University SIPA
Panelists:  Scott Barrett, Lenfest-Earth Institute Professor of Natural Resource Economics, Columbia University; Alliance (Visiting) Professor, Sciences Po; and Centennial (Visiting) Professor, London School of Economics
Amy Dahan, Emeritus Research Director at the CNRS (Paris, France)
Paul Watkinson, Counsellor to Director for European and International Action, Ministry for Ecological Transition, France - former chief negotiator, former chair of Subsidiary Body for Scientific and Technological Advice of UNFCCC

This webinar will be hosted via Zoom. Advance registration is required. Upon registration, you will receive a confirmation email with access details. The event will be recorded and the video recording will be added to our website following the event.

This event is open to press, and registration is required to attend. For media inquiries or requests for interviews, please contact Natalie Volk (nv2388@columbia.edu).

For more information about the event, please contact energypolicyevents@columbia.edu.

----------------

Flipgrid Live Event: Responding to Environmental Racism
Thursday, April 7
3:00 PM EDT TO 3:30 PM EDT
RSVP at https:
retailevents.microsoft.com/event/registration?id=Flipgrid_Live_Event1877343570

Please join us at 3:00pm EDT on Thursday, April 7 for a special event with journalist, poet, and Pulitzer Center reporting fellow Irene Vázquez, hosted in partnership with Flipgrid Live! Irene will talk about what environmental racism is, and how Black and Indigenous organizers are responding to the effects of climate change in their communities.

This event is designed for teachers and students ages 12 and up, but is open to all.

Irene Vázquez is a poet, editor, and journalist from Houston, Texas. She is an incoming editorial assistant at Levine Querido. Irene is a recent graduate of Yale College, where she was an Edward A. Bouchet Fellow. Her writing explores Black placemaking, feminisms, and ecopoetics in the U.S. South and Caribbean. Vázquez is a 2020 recipient of a NLGJA: The Association of LGBTQ Journalists Scholarship as well as a We Need Diverse Books Internship Grant. Her work has been published in The Texas Observer, Curbed, and Sargasso: A Journal of Caribbean Literature, Language and Culture. When she's not writing, she likes drinking coffee, watching women's basketball, and reminding people that the South has something to say.

----------------

Climate Doom and Eco-Anxiety
Thursday, April 7
6:00 PM - 7:00 PM
https:
events.columbia.edu/cal/event/showEventMore.rdo

This will be a Q&A panel event with four panelists working on climate change and the way it shapes mental health, media, art, and activism. Climate anxiety is the feelings of grief, despair, angst, and doom surrounding the deterioration of the climate. Climate anxiety is on the rise, 2/3 of young Americans and over half of all Americans are anxious about its effect on their mental health. As young people witness slow action to address climate change, this feeling of anxiety continues to grow. The panelists will delve into how various forms of art and activism can foster hope and engagement as we work through climate anxiety. The audience will learn more about resources and opportunities to address climate anxiety while staying active in pushing for change. This conversation will be hosted over Zoom and will be moderated by Columbia undergraduate student and Columbia Climate Conversations creator, Lauren Ritchie. The event will be open to anyone who RSVPs, not limited to only Columbia students.

Event Contact Information:
Earth Institute Events
events@ei.columbia.edu

----------------

Decarbonizing Europe is Important and Challenging
Friday, April 8
9 - 10 a.m.
RSVP at https:
harvard.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_JAb5ED3xSEu5Iku2zy96uA

SPEAKER(S)  Dan Jørgensen, Minister of Climate, Energy, and Utilities, Kingdom of Denmark
As a global leader in efforts to combat climate change, Denmark is aiming to phase out its oil and gas production and produce more than 100 percent of its electricity demand by renewables by 2027. Dan Jørgensen, the Danish Minister of Climate, Energy and Utilities, will be our guest for the next HPCA Virtual Forum, "Conversations on Climate Change and Energy Policy," on April 8. Minister Jørgensen played a significant role in maintaining the focus on reducing the rise of global temperatures during COP26 in Glasgow, serving as co-leader on the consultations in the "ambition track." In addition, he launched the Beyond Oil and Gas Alliance (BOGA) during the COP. The April 8th discussion will focus on climate policy in general, including the Paris Agreement, COP26, and Danish and European efforts to decarbonize their economies.

CONTACT INFO    jason_chapman@hks.harvard.edu

----------------

Crimes against humanity, genocide, and ecocide: Of rights, responsibilities, and international order
The eighth annual Justice Stephen Breyer Lecture on International Law
Friday, April 8
11:00 AM EDT - 1:00 PM EDT
RSVP at https:
connect.brookings.edu/register-to-watch-breyer-lecture

Join the conversation on Twitter using #InternationalLaw
On April 8, 2022, as part of the eighth annual Justice Stephen Breyer Lecture on International Law, Foreign Policy at Brookings will host Philippe Sands, professor of law at University College London and Samuel and Judith Pisar visiting professor of law at Harvard Law School, for a keynote address on rights, responsibilities, and international order.

Sands will explore the evolution of the rights of individuals and groups under international law, from the introduction of the ideas of aggression, crimes against humanity, and genocide -- introduced at the Nuremberg Trial, in the autumn of 1945 -- to the treatment of these issues in current times, including ISIS and the Yazidis; the Rohingya in Myanmar; the Uighurs in China; and the Chagosians and the Chagos Archipelago. He will also address the current situation in Ukraine and touch on new ideas to extend the reach of international law to criminalize severe harm to the environment.

After the keynote address, Nonresident Senior Fellow Ted Piccone will join Sands for a conversation on the role of international law in prosecuting crimes against humanity, genocide, and ecocide. A panel discussion of distinguished experts on these issues will follow their conversation.

Viewers can submit questions by email to events@brookings.edu or on Twitter using #InternationalLaw.

----------------

2022 Urbanism Spring Lecture Series: Dalia Munenzon on Climate Adaptive Cities
Tuesday, April 12
12:30pm to 1:45pm
Virtual Event

Co-hosted by the City Design & Development Program (CDD), SMArchS Urbanism Program and Norman B. Leventhal Center for Advanced Urbanism at MIT.

This lecture, Climate Adaptive Cities, will be streamed online here:  http://web.mit.edu/webcast/lcau/s22/lecture/9/
The webcast link includes a section where you can submit questions to the speaker for the Q&A period in real time.

----------------

Compensation for a Just Energy Transition to a Zero-Carbon World
Thursday, April 14
9:00 AM - 10:30 AM
RSVP at https:
columbiauniversity.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_uiPWB2wAROSgXy_yPCFOOw
You will automatically receive a Zoom link to join the event upon registration.
Registration is free but required.

Limiting global warming to 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels, in line with the Paris Agreement, requires significant reductions in emissions of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases (GHG) by 2030 and net-zero GHG emissions by mid-century, and ultimately depends on a rapid shift away from fossil fuels.

As we take measures to decarbonize the global energy system, we also need to consider the distributional equity impacts of the energy transition on workers, communities, states, and foreign and domestic investors, and to reflect on the role that international and domestic legal frameworks play and should play in addressing those impacts.

The Columbia Center on Sustainable Investment (CCSI) and the Sabin Center for Climate Change Law--joint centers of the Earth Institute / Columbia Climate School and Columbia Law School at Columbia University--will co-host a 90-minute webinar on April 14 at 9am EST / 3pm CEST, focusing on legal approaches to compensation for a just energy transition.

Webinar discussions will cover, among others, the following topics:
A critique of the issue of compensation under investment treaties, including the Energy Charter Treaty (ECT), from a climate change perspective
A review of arbitral tribunals' approaches to the valuation of fossil fuel assets in selected investor-state dispute settlement (ISDS) cases
A case study of Germany's compensation scheme for lignite producers, as an example of a compensation scheme under domestic law
A discussion of possible principles or criteria on compensation for a just energy transition under domestic and international law, taking into account the impact of the transition on workers, communities, states, and companies

Moderator:  Michael Burger, Executive Director, Sabin Center for Climate Change Law

Panelists:  Martin Dietrich Brauch, Senior Legal and Economics Researcher, CCSI
Kyla Tienhaara, Canada Research Chair in Economy and Environment, School of Environmental Studies and the Department of Global Development Studies, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada
Blanca Gómez de la Torre, Partner and Head of Dispute Resolution: Litigation and Arbitration, ECIJA GPA; former National Director for International Affairs and Arbitration at the Office of the Attorney-General Office of Ecuador
Sarah Brown, Senior Energy & Climate Analyst, Ember

----------------

"Saving the News: Why the Constitution Calls for Government Action to Preserve Freedom of Speech," a Conversation with Martha Minow and Heather Hendershot
Thursday, April 14
5:00pm to 6:30pm
Virtual Event
This event is virtual and will be streamed live on Zoom (https:
mit.zoom.us/j/96579656038#success) and recorded.

In her 2021 book Saving the News: Why the Constitution Calls for Government Action to Preserve Freedom of Speech, our guest Martha Minow "outlines an array of reforms, including a new fairness doctrine, regulating digital platforms as public utilities, using antitrust authority to regulate the media, policing fraud, and more robust funding of public media. As she stresses, such reforms are not merely plausible ideas; they are the kinds of initiatives needed if the First Amendment guarantee of freedom of the press continues to hold meaning in the twenty-first century."

Martha Minow has taught at Harvard Law School, where she also served as Dean, since 1981. In addition to Saving the News, she is author of When Should Law Forgive? (2019), In Brown's Wake: Legacies of America's Constitutional Landmark (2010), among many other books and articles. She is an expert in human rights and advocacy for members of racial and religious minorities and for women, children, and persons with disabilities, she also writes and teaches about digital communications, democracy, privatization, military justice, and ethnic and religious conflict.

Heather Hendershot is Professor of Comparative Media Studies at MIT and studies TV news, conservative media, political movements, and American film and television history. She is author of the forthcoming book When the News Broke: Chicago 1968 and the Polarizing of America, which follows her 2016 title Open to Debate: How William F. Buckley Put Liberal America on the Firing Line. She has held fellowships at Vassar College, New York University, Princeton, Harvard, Radcliffe, and Stanford, and she has also been a Guggenheim fellow. Her courses emphasize the interplay between creative, political, and regulatory concerns and how those concerns affect what we see on the screen.

----------------

FIRE AND FLOOD: A People's History of Climate Change, from 1979 to the Present
Thursday, April 14
3 P.M. PDT
RSVP at https:
commonwealthclub.secure.force.com/ticket?_ga=2.188851369.368955509.1648949338-149928173.164 3172478#instances/a0F3j00001Tvq5jEAB

Join us for an online talk with environmental journalist Eugene Linden.

In his new book, Fire and Blood, Linden examines the role of business interests in muddying messages from scientists and derailing attempts to galvanize the public. He tells a story of big monied interests doing what they do to protect short-term profits against longer-term threats. One of the through-lines of the book is the insurance industry's response to climate change, which for a long time was painfully slow, but recently has pivoted quite dramatically. Florida and California are seeing the housing insurance sector retreat from entire regions because of the unmanageable risks of fire and flood--some believe that the housing markets in parts of those two states are another bad season or two away from collapse. In a larger sense, big business, which for so long has been a woeful headwind to needed change, is waking up to the need to act very quickly now, as the long term has become the near term with terrifying speed.

Eugene Linden is an award-winning journalist and author on science, nature and the environment. He is the author of nine books of non-fiction and one novel. His previous book on climate change, Winds of Change, explored the connection between climate change and the rise and fall of civilizations and was awarded the Grantham Prize Special Award of Merit. For many years, Linden wrote about nature and global environmental issues for Time, where he garnered several awards, including the American Geophysical Union's Walter Sullivan Award.

This is an online-only program; you must pre-register to receive a link to the live-stream event. We welcome donations made during registration to support the production of our online programming.

----------------

The Ongoing Crisis for Afghan Refugees
Friday, April 15
12:00pm to 1:30pm
Virtual Event
Please register for the virtual Zoom webinar at https:
bit.ly/AfghanRefugeeCrisis

Panel discussion with experts :: Part of the Myron Weiner Seminar Series on International Migration
Panelists:
Dipali Mukhopadhyay is Associate Professor in the global policy area at the Humphrey School of Public Affairs at the University of Minnesota. Her research focuses on the relationships between political violence, state building, and governance during and after war. She is currently serving as senior expert on Afghanistan for the U.S. Institute of Peace and is an affiliated scholar with Columbia University's Saltzman Institute of War and Peace Studies. She is also the Vice President of the American Institute for Afghanistan Studies.

Nilofar Sakhi is a professorial lecturer of International Affairs at Elliott School of George Washington University. She is also a senior fellow (NR) at the Atlantic Council, South Asia Program.  Sakhi is a scholar and policy practitioner who has written extensively on various aspects of peacemaking and peacebuilding processes, transnational security, and human security. Her recent book is on Human Security and Agency: Reframing productive power in Afghanistan.

Omar Sharifi is a Research Fellow and Lecturer at the Hubert H. Humphrey School of Public Affairs, University of Minnesota.  He was the former Senior Research Fellow and Kabul Director of the American Institute of Afghanistan Studies (AIAS). He is also a member of the advisory board of the Civil Society Development Center (CSDC) and member of the Board of Directors of the Afghan Alumni Association and Afghanistan 1400.  In addition, Omar worked as a National Consultant for UNICEF Afghanistan. He is an Asia Society Fellow and a member of Afghan 21 Young Leaders Forum.

Moderator:
Anna Hardman is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Economics at Tufts University and is a co-chair for the Inter-University Committee on International Migration at MIT CIS.  Her research focuses on urban economics (regulation and the informal sector in housing markets in developing countries, the development and provision of services in peri-urban areas, and neighborhood income distribution) and on migration (remittances and the impact of immigration on housing markets in migrants' home and host communities).

----------------

Energy Policy Seminar: Alexandre Strapasson on "Biofuels and Negative Emissions Technologies"
Monday, April 18
12 - 1 p.m.
RSVP at https:
www.belfercenter.org/event/energy-policy-seminar-alexandre-strapasson-biofuels-and-negative- emissions-technologies

SPEAKER(S)  Alexandre Strapasson, Research Fellow, Environment and Natural Resources Program, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs
DETAILS    
If the world is to prevent a major increase in the global mean surface temperature, it will be necessary not only to reduce carbon emissions, but also to remove carbon from the atmosphere. Photosynthesis is a natural mechanism to obtain such reductions. However, is it possible to store carbon while also using biomass energy?
Join us for an Energy Policy Seminar featuring Alexandre Strapasson, Research Fellow with the Environment and Natural Resources Program. Dr. Strapasson will explore how bioenergy and land use can provide negative emissions, including new technologies and trends, as well as the main opportunities and risks associated with them.

CONTACT INFO    Elizabeth Hanlon (ehanlon@hks.harvard.edu)

----------------

Energy Poverty and Global Justice Issues: Narasimha Rao, Yale
Monday, April 18
2:30 PM EDT -- 3:30 PM
RSVP at https:
yale.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_CDGme6PBRRCPRhdQ9Py01Q

This lecture is part of the Yale Energy Justice Speaker Series and will be led by Dr. Narasimha Rao, Yale University Professor of Energy Systems

Dr. Narasimha D. Rao's research examines the relationship between energy systems, human development and climate change. He is the recipient of the European Research Council (ERC) Starting Grant (2015-2019) for a project entitled Decent Living Energy -energy and emissions thresholds for providing decent living standards for all. His research interests also include investigating income inequality, infrastructure, and climate policy. His methods include household energy modeling, econometrics, input-output, and policy analysis.

Dr. Rao is also a Senior Research Scholar at the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis. He received his PhD from Stanford University in Environment and Resources, Masters from Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Electrical Engineering and Technology Policy, and A.B from Dartmouth College.

Readings:
Energy Progress Report on Sustainable Development Goal 7, 2021 https:
trackingsdg7.esmap.org/data/files/download-documents/2021_tracking_sdg7_report.pdf
Arto et. al, 2016, "The energy requirements of a developed world." https:
doi.org/10.1016/j.esd.2016.04.001
Rao and Baer, 2012, ""Decent Living" Emissions: A Conceptual Framework,https:
www.mdpi.com/2071-1050/4/4/656

----------------

Sello Verde: Becoming Climate-Positive Organizations
Tuesday, April 19
6:00 PM EDT
https:
www.eventbrite.com/e/sello-verde-becoming-climate-positive-organizations-tickets-25340398714 7

Emissions of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases are responsible for climate change and global warming. Limiting these emissions is one of the biggest challenges human beings have ever faced.

What is net zero? How is it different from climate positive or carbon negative? Does climate neutrality still matter?

Speaker:  Imran Anwar, Chief Innovation Officer, Microsoft, New York, US. IMRANTM is best known as "father of the Internet & Email industry in Pakistan" and is among early pioneers of the Internet. He co-founded PKNIC & the .PK ccTLD; and launched the global branded credit card industry there with MasterCard. He achieved these disruptions overcoming threats and resistance from religious-fundamentalist dictatorship of a military ruler.

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Exploring evolutionary immunogenomics: Lessons from our ancestors and past pandemics
Wednesday, April 20
12:00 AM ET
RSVP at https:
view6.workcast.net/register?cpak=5259998115912167&referrer=ScienceWebsite

SPEAKER  Luis Barreiro, Ph.D.
MODERATOR  Jackie Oberst, Ph.D.
This webinar is brought to you by the Science/AAAS Custom Publishing Office.
Humans display remarkable immune response variation when exposed to identical immune challenges. However, our understanding of the genetic, evolutionary, and environmental factors that impact this interindividual and interpopulation immune response heterogeneity is still in its early days. In this webinar, three fundamental questions concerning the recent evolution of the human immune system will be discussed: (1) the degree to which individuals from different populations vary in their innate immune responses; (2) the genetic variants accounting for such differences; and (3) the evolutionary mechanisms that led to the establishment of these variants in modern human populations. How past selective events might have contributed to the uneven distribution of immune-related disorders across populations will also be considered.

During this webinar, viewers will:
Gain insight into how past pandemics, such as Yersinia pestis, the agent of the Black Death, led to the evolution of the human immune system
Discover how the unique immunogenetic variation in present-day populations has impacted population differences in immune response to pathogens and susceptibility to immune-related disorders
Learn how cutting-edge techniques, such as RNA sequencing (RNA-seq), are used in evolutionary immunogenomics
Be able to ask questions during the live broadcast.
This webinar will last for approximately 60 minutes.

----------------

In the Name of Your Daughter
Tuesday, April 26
7:00 PM Eastern
RSVP at https:
docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSfaWtnXNXjBu2MqiGPyaiJ95eCdxQzu7dw9qAZTxBDDeHcGqw/viewform

Healthy Tomorrow, a nonprofit working to stop FGM (female genital mutilation) in Mali and worldwide, will host an online screening of In the Name of Your Daughter on Tuesday, April 26, 2022 at 7:00 PM Eastern / 4:00 PM Pacific time.

The film documents a safe house in Tanzania that shelters courageous girls who fled from home to escape FGM at the hands of their families and communities. It gives a rare insider view of life in the safe house for girls and staff, and of emotional interactions with the families.

In a post-show panel, director Giselle Portenier and Healthy Tomorrow founder Susan McLucas will discuss the film and the current global movement against FGM and take questions from viewers.

The event is free of charge.  Donations are invited to support the work of Healthy Tomorrow and Hope for Girls and Women which runs the safe house.

For more information about Healthy Tomorrow, visit StopExcision.net

--------------

A Changing Planet Seminar: Antarctic marine ecosystems under pressure
Wednesday, April 27
11:00 - 12:00 GMT-04:00
RSVP at https:
www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/a-changing-planet-seminar-antarctic-marine-ecosystems-under-pressure- tickets-304770606087

Dr Sian Henley, Lecturer in Marine Science, University of Edinburgh
This event is taking place in person, with a livestream (online access via Zoom) for those attending attending online.

Antarctic and Southern Ocean ecosystems are under increasing pressure from global climate change and direct human impacts. Decisive, immediate action on climate change mitigation is required at the global scale, as well as effective management at the local scale, to protect these ecosystems and their societal benefits worldwide.

The Southern Ocean is globally important for regulating climate by taking up atmospheric carbon dioxide, connecting the world's oceans and ocean-climate system, and supporting key species and ecosystem services. Global climate change and ocean acidification are impacting the health and productivity of the Southern Ocean, with knock-on effects on these critical processes as well as regional fisheries (e.g. Antarctic krill) and other ecosystem services.

The first Marine Ecosystem Assessment for the Southern Ocean (MEASO, 2021) has shown significant changes in Antarctic and Southern Ocean ecosystems, driven by global climate change and direct human impacts. MEASO is an international collaboration of over 200 researchers from 19 countries. A team of scientists from the MEASO initiative attended the UN Climate Change Conference COP26 to present the key findings and advocate for urgent global reductions in greenhouse gas emissions to instigate climate recovery and to avoid irreversible deterioration of Southern Ocean ecosystems and associated loss of their wide-ranging societal benefits. In this talk, I will present an overview of the key findings and make the case that only by mitigating global climate change, alongside effective local conservation and management, can we effectively safeguard these vulnerable polar oceans now and into the future.

About the speaker
Dr Sian Henley is a Lecturer in Marine Science at the University of Edinburgh. She also serves as Vice Chair of the Southern Ocean Observing System (SOOS), a member of the Southern Ocean Task Force for the UN Decade of Ocean Science for Sustainable Development, and a Science Theme Leader within the Scottish Alliance for Geoscience, Environment and Society (SAGES). Sian has a diverse range of research interests from polar ocean ecosystem change to climate change impacts on children worldwide, and is a passionate lecturer, educator and communicator across the spectrum of marine and polar science.

----------------

Bears Ears is Listening: We Are Still Here and The Land is Calling Us Back
Thursday, April 28
1 - 2 p.m.
RSVP at https:
/harvard.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_pR2zWCsDRQ6fMEwVH6OomQ

Cynthia Wilson, (RPL Native and Indigenous Rights Fellow) and Angelo Baca ( Cultural Resources Coordinator for Utah Diné Bikéyah) will speak from their experience as Indigenous community organizers helping to secure the protection of Bears Ears National Monument. Located in southeast Utah, Bears Ears was subjected to Proclamation 9681 by President Trump in 2017 to reduce protected lands by more than 1.1 million acres. Following an Indigenous-led movement to protect Bears Ears, a reparative proclamation to modify the boundaries was issued by President Biden in October, 2021. Cynthia Wilson and Angelo Baca will discuss lessons learned from listening, organizing, mobilizing, and planning from a placed-based approach while engaging local Tribal voices, advancing community priorities and goals of ancestral land protection.

Poll
More energy and other events?
. yes 0%
. no 0%
. not yes 0%
. not no 0%
. neither yes nor no 0%
. both yes and no 0%
. don't understand the question? 0%
. none of the above 0%

Votes: 0
Results | Other Polls
Display:
New edition of IPCC "Mitigation of Climate Change" report came out today after a last-minute delay due to arguments about how blunt it should be.

TLDR: It's not blunt enough.

Even the overview, the "Summary for Policymakers" is completely unreadable, full of incomprehensible footnotes and confusing charts. If the authors think the audience for this work is the staff members of politicians, they have obviously not spent much time with the staff members of politicians. It's a struggle to get through it even if you are already familiar with the arguments and the terminology and are a climate catastrophist looking for a shred of hope.

Also, the words "It's too late!" do not occur anywhere in the documents. It's easy to figure that out if you look at the charts, which mostly show the results of miraculous political changes that will occur tomorrow. And if you notice that they admit now that massive carbon capture will be needed--using a magical technology that has not been invented yet but that will be deployed globally within a couple of decades.

It's too late.

by asdf on Mon Apr 4th, 2022 at 11:02:55 PM EST
miraculous political changes that will occur tomorrow
< wipes tears >
by Cat on Tue Apr 5th, 2022 at 01:00:17 PM EST
[ Parent ]
"And if you notice that they admit now that massive carbon capture will be needed--using a magical technology that has not been invented yet but that will be deployed globally within a couple of decades."

Reading Geotherapy:  Innovative Methods of Soil Fertility Restoration, Carbon Sequestration, and Reversing CO2 Increase (https://www.taylorfrancis.com/books/edit/10.1201/b13788/geotherapy-thomas-goreau-ronal-larson-joann a-campe) in 2017 convinced me that such known and already practiced techniques can reduce the amount of CO2 in the atmosphere quickly, safely, and productively within a few decades if we deploy these ideas consistently and globally.  

Then I learned that aquatic plants like seagrasses can sequester up to 35 times the amount of CO2 terrestrial plants can and became more convinced than ever that we need to focus on geotherapy more than technology and geoengineering.

Of course, IPCC and its legions of scientists seem to have missed all this and think of biological carbon capture only in terms of trees.

We have the tools to make the necessary changes but we don't have anyone in power who recognizes that reality, even in the IPCC.

PS:  Eelgrass not only sequesters carbon but produces a perennial grain.  There's a Spanish chef now experimenting with it.

Solar IS Civil Defense

by gmoke on Tue Apr 5th, 2022 at 06:54:47 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Terra preta, as practised by the great Amazonian neolithic civilisation. It can be accomplished on a huge scale using low-tech anaerobic combustion by peasant farmers, enriching low-fertility soils and sequestering carbon in the form of charcoal for centuries.

I quite understand that there's no money in promoting it, but I don't know why the charitable aid sector isn't all over this technique. Any ideas, gmoke?

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II

by eurogreen on Fri Apr 8th, 2022 at 02:24:33 PM EST
[ Parent ]
On a Zoom with the Danish Minister of Climate, Energy, and Utilities this morning, he talked about the necessity to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from agriculture in that country and that the technologies of direct air capture of CO2 are necessary but not yet economic or scalable but the moderator did not take my question about using geotherapeutic techniques like terra preta or regenerative agriculture which are both scalable and economic now.

This refusal to look at natural solutions is evident throughout the climate movement.  Too many physicists and chemists talking but not enough ecologists and soil scientists are given the floor.

Solar IS Civil Defense

by gmoke on Fri Apr 8th, 2022 at 04:29:28 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Interesting comments on IPCC report at https:/www.drilledpodcast.com/debunking-demand-ipcc-mitigation-report-part-1

"Basically the fossil fuel industry is using this fake narrative of demand-driven production to excuse their activities," Steinberger says. "But as soon as you look at demand, the story crumbles. Because all we need is services; that's what there is demand for. We don't need the energy use itself. So let's think about how we deliver those services in a more efficient way."
by asdf on Wed Apr 6th, 2022 at 04:36:25 PM EST
The missing ingredient in climate change action.

This week, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, or IPCC, released a report that emphasized that the barriers to accomplishing progress on climate change are largely political, not scientific.

The report, dedicated to analyzing the solutions to climate change, found that, thanks to decades of work by researchers, the world has the science, the technologies, and much of the engineering prowess needed to scale down emissions and ensure a livable planet. The missing ingredient is the political will to make those adjustments. Actions taken by a powerful minority -- led by lawmakers and lobbyists for the fossil fuel industry -- have prevented the world from confronting this existential threat.

by asdf on Fri Apr 8th, 2022 at 02:46:43 PM EST
by Cat on Sat Apr 9th, 2022 at 04:09:45 PM EST
[ Parent ]
It is also interesting that people are now demonstrating at the ONE coal plant in West Virginia that buys coal from Joe Manchin's company.  That's some very direct action.

Solar IS Civil Defense
by gmoke on Sat Apr 9th, 2022 at 08:58:15 PM EST
[ Parent ]
FT | Eon rules out German nuclear power plant extension 16 hrs ago

vOLdAmorE BULLETIN 2 hrs ago

German-owned European energy giant, E.ON, has ruled out extending the lifetime of the three nuclear power plants it is operating in Germany citing political climate in the country. Despite facing pressure to ditch buying Russian gas because of its special military operation in Ukraine, and thus facing potential power shortages, Berlin ruled in March 2022 that it won't be prolonging its phasing out of nuclear energy which is scheduled to finish in 2023.

"There is no future for nuclear in Germany, period. It is too emotional. There will be no change in legislation and opinion", E.ON Chief Executive Officer Leo Birnbaum said.
[...]
The E.ON chief executive called the move to conclude wrapping up nuclear energy production a "decent trade-off decision" on Berlin's part.

At the same time, Birnbaum called on the German government to abstain from boycotting Russian gas as it would have drastic negative implications for the country's industry - a call echoed by other companies in Germany. The E.ON boss said that a shutdown of such giants as chemical company BASF, would have a dangerous effect on the country's economy far exceeding that of the COVID-19 lockdowns.

EMBARGO!!2!
by Cat on Mon Apr 11th, 2022 at 06:45:45 PM EST
Germany boosts renewables with "biggest energy policy reform in decades"
https://www.cleanenergywire.org/news/germany-boosts-renewables-biggest-energy-policy-reform-decades

Germany's new energy policy:
climate-neutral by 2045
80% renewable power (600 TWh) by 2030
near 100% by 2035
the use of renewable energies is of overriding public interest & has priority over other concerns until greenhouse gas neutrality is achieved

Solar IS Civil Defense

by gmoke on Mon Apr 11th, 2022 at 07:56:22 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The 2045 date will be overtaken by events. Right now is the time for Germany (and everybody else) to undertake a crash change to their energy systems and their economies. We'll already be to 2.0 degrees C by 2045.

https:/www.ipcc.ch/sr15/chapter/spm/spm-a/spm1_figure-final-2

by asdf on Tue Apr 12th, 2022 at 12:50:48 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Just remember, there is no such thing as "too late". There is no brick wall to hit, no cliff edge to plunge into. It's more like the shit we are wading in is getting deeper with every step. Any mitigation is always worthwhile.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II
by eurogreen on Tue Apr 12th, 2022 at 03:47:53 PM EST
[ Parent ]
by gmoke on Tue Apr 12th, 2022 at 06:35:48 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I'm not ready to concede that there is no such thing as "too late."

It depends on how you look at it. To maintain the current global standard of living (including all the various asymmetries between countries and regions), a certain amount of economic activity is needed. If it becomes impossible to maintain that level without further increasing the temperature of the atmosphere-ocean system, that is a brick wall.

If one accepts the idea of a global reduction in standard of living, then there is probably no brick wall. Maybe the temperature goes up 5 degrees and the human population is reduced to a few hundred million people existing at 1 CE living standards.

The problem is that the IPCC reports have now gotten to the point where they include things like carbon capture, which is of questionable technical feasibility EVEN IF it were pursued. And there is lots of talk about mass transportation--high speed rail, electric cars, wind-powered ships--but the available timeline is way, way, way too short EVEN IF these ideas were pursued.

They show pathways that will keep the temperature rise to 1.5 degrees, but all of the pathways require completely unrealistic projections of political action. Meanwhile, what is actually happening is opening up additional fracking and drilling projects, reducing taxes on fuel, and a variety of other things that will just make the problem worse.

Technically, the problem could be solved. Politically, I don't see it. It is hard, for me at least, to remain optimistic.

by asdf on Tue Apr 12th, 2022 at 10:35:22 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Hm, reducing the energy intensity of EU economies, at near constant output, isn't that hard, if governments and enterprises can concentrate on it. Lots of low-hanging fruit just drop off the tree when energy prices get high enough.

Not sure if this maps well the the US, for example. A large proportion of the population lives outside the temperate climate zones, meaning the energy costs of just living are pretty exorbitant. And only getting worse.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II

by eurogreen on Wed Apr 13th, 2022 at 01:45:36 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The questions are 1.) can such a change happen quickly enough, and 2.) will societies and politicians act to make them happen.

I am pessimistic about both.

by asdf on Wed Apr 13th, 2022 at 03:08:54 PM EST
[ Parent ]

by asdf on Wed Apr 13th, 2022 at 03:43:30 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Sorry for two graphs, Preview option didn't display the tweet in full.
by asdf on Wed Apr 13th, 2022 at 03:44:15 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I can't see either from my work computer anyway :)

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II
by eurogreen on Wed Apr 13th, 2022 at 03:59:50 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The current war has the virtue of focusing minds. In the short term, Europeans are flapping their hands and saying "we must reopen the old coal mines".
BUT :
The German government is serious about going carbon neutral, and they have a plan. A few other governments also. The war may end up being a trigger to push them into war mode : run up debt and boost your economy by spending more than planned on doing the energy transition faster.

And then of course, they are the world experts, and will be able to export to the rest of us.

The business case of doing this is pretty clear, but the war may end up making it clearer.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II

by eurogreen on Wed Apr 13th, 2022 at 04:32:33 PM EST
[ Parent ]
You keep using that phrase as if you knew what business objective, which P&E requirements, and which measurements  one employs to contruct one. Why is that?
by Cat on Wed Apr 13th, 2022 at 06:39:03 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Every corporation in a capitalist system has a business plan build on maximising profit for the shareholder. That is why Onyx coal fired power plant stays open and returns $240m contract with Dutch government to shut operation by 2023. Gov must seek funds to buy out more farmers as CO2 compensation.

'Sapere aude'
by Oui (Oui) on Wed Apr 13th, 2022 at 06:56:02 PM EST
[ Parent ]
CO2 compensation is (very topical) bullshit, of course  - shame on the Dutch government. HHowever, in a context where nitrogen fertiliser is currently too costly to manufacture in Europe (because it's 100% natural gas) there may be a ... "business case" for turning that Dutch nitrogen pollution into nitrogen fertiliser?

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II
by eurogreen on Thu Apr 14th, 2022 at 10:55:23 AM EST
[ Parent ]

Dutch court ruling ...

Royal Dutch Shell must reduce CO2 emissions

This case builds on the landmark Urgenda decision which found that the Dutch government's inadequate action on climate change violated a duty of care to its citizens.

Thus Shell shareholders decide to make move for a single HQ in financial paradise, London. Shell loses the exclusive "Royal" designation from colonial times in Indonesia - founded in 1907.

'Sapere aude'

by Oui (Oui) on Thu Apr 14th, 2022 at 06:34:22 PM EST
[ Parent ]

ABNAmro apologises for historical links to slavery | The Guardian |

The bank said Hope & Co "played a pivotal role in the international slave economy of the 18th century", in a statement published yesterday. A previous study had already found that ABNAmro predecessors were involved in slavery in the US.

In Dutch society it is conveniently called "old money" belonging to a small number of renowned families that are super rich, filthy rich from the days of East India Company (VOC) and the Golden Century.

'Sapere aude'

by Oui (Oui) on Thu Apr 14th, 2022 at 06:53:20 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I am infected by ordo-liberal capitalist vocabulary.
I am talking about the "business case" for the governments of sovereign states. If indeed I "keep using" the phrase "business case" then it's a tic, and I need to stamp it out. Thank you.

I could use an IT vocabulary, which I actually master, but is not necessarily accessible to non-professionals.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II

by eurogreen on Thu Apr 14th, 2022 at 10:50:21 AM EST
[ Parent ]
According to this carbon countdown clock (https://www.mcc-berlin.net/fileadmin/data/clock/carbon_clock.htm), at the current rate, the most CO2 we can emit to stay below 1.5ºC rise is 400 Gt, starting from 2020, and that carbon budget will be used up by about July/August  2029.  

We are at 307 Gts left as I write.

It is amazing to me that climate experts keep talking about CO2 levels instead of the truly operative number, CO2e or CO2 equivalent for all the known greenhouse gases (ghgs) as expressed as measure by CO2 impact, and focus on the amount of ghgs instead of the carbon budget and the time we have left within said budget.  

A climate deadline, methinks, would concentrate minds very efficiently.  And backcasting what needs to be done from that date to now would be a good action plan.

Solar IS Civil Defense

by gmoke on Tue Apr 12th, 2022 at 06:41:37 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Absolutely... Although when I was keeping up to date with these questions through realclimate, I got the impression that the other climate forcings, positive and negative, just about canceled each other out, and that CO2 was a good proxy for the overall forcing.

Mind you, that was at least 5 years ago... perhaps 10... time for an update! Both the concensus and the real world may have rendered that understanding obsolete.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II

by eurogreen on Wed Apr 13th, 2022 at 01:49:59 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Climate migration is already taking place in the US, as westerners and coastal dwellers retreat from the various disasters Mother Nature has deployed. I'm not so sure that Vermont is the optimal place to go to, though. New England is already hot and humid and buggy in the summer and it could get worse.
by asdf on Thu Apr 14th, 2022 at 10:03:09 PM EST


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